Faculty

Elementary Education (EED)

Picture of Josephine Arce
Position:
Department Chair
Phone
415-338-7636
Biography:

Dr. Arce has over 35 years of teaching experience in teaching in K-5 elementary schools, district leadership roles as a literacy curriculum coordinator and leader, Reading Recovery Teacher Leader (English and Spanish) and professor at SFSU. She completed her BA in Political Science at UCSB, MA in Latin American Studies at CSU Los Angeles, and her Doctorate in Education at the University of San Francisco.  Her dissertation was titled: Developing Voices: Transformative Education in a First Grade Spanish Two-Way Immersion Classroom, A Participatory Study. It received the Outstanding Dissertation Semi-finalist, National Association for Bilingual Educators, 1997. Two-way immersion teaching and learning settings continue to be of keen interest in preparation of bilingual teacher credential programs.

Scholarly Interests

Her specializations are in teacher education, teaching literacy, socio-linguistics and bilingual education. She is particularly interested in researching teacher education preparation programs and their impact on developing novice teachers who are bilingual and bi-cultural. Critical to her research is to explore the impact of high-stake testing and evaluation instruments impact novice teachers’ development on professional and personal levels. Her research seeks to unfold the complexities of teaching and becoming culturally responsive educators. Dr. Arce uses self-study and participatory research designs to conduct her research.

Advocacy Interests

Dr. Arce has always worked to create opportunities for marginalized communities. Collectively she engages with communities to envision and build transformative educational settings by challenging racism and institutional barriers that exclude People of Color and non-mainstream communities. She is deeply committed to understanding and applying critical pedagogy and culturally responsive approaches in public schools, including in teacher education preparation programs.

Courses Taught

She teaches in the Master of Arts: Concentration Language and Literacy, Reading Specialists, the Multiple Subject Credential Programs (CLAD and the Spanish-Bilingual Authorization Programs). She values the responsibility of overseeing and guiding MA graduates in Language and Literacy during their field study/thesis.  She has taught many of the credential program courses and supervised student teaching. Since 2011 she has coordinated the Bilingual Educators for Social Transformation Multiple Subject Credential Bilingual Authorization Program (BEST).

Selected Publications

  • Arce, J. (April 2013). Latina Professor Revitalizing Historical Memory: Resistance Politics and Transformation Within Teacher Education in the United States. Studying Teacher Education: Journal of Self-Study of Teacher Education Practice. Published online: DOI:10.1080/17425964.2013.780512.
  • Arce, J. (2012). Preparing Preservice Spanish, Bilingual Teachers to Develop a Vision for Transformative Education.  In Gallardo, O.M. & Ramírez, L. Multicultural education in practice: Transforming communities one at a time (pp.115-126). CA: California Association of Bilingual Educators.
  • Arce, J. & Padilla-Detwiller, E. (2012). Scaffolding Discussions to Develop Comprehension and Student Voices. In Fingon, J.C. & Ulanoff, S.H. (Eds.), Learning from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Classrooms: Promoting Success for All Students (pp. 142-160). NY: Teachers College Press.
Picture of Ali Borjian
Position:
Professor
Phone
415-338-1838
Biography:

Ali Borjian is Professor of Education at San Francisco State University.  A Fulbright scholar, he has conducted research on cross national teacher education programs in Latin America.  In addition to working with teacher candidates in elementary education, Dr. Borjian teaches in the M.A. program in Language and Literacy and the Doctoral Program in Educational Leadership. His research interests include teacher education and context of learning for immigrant children and youth. Prior to receiving his doctorate, Dr. Borjian was an elementary school teacher.

Education Background:

  • Ph.D. in Language, Learning and Policy (Stanford University)

Selected Peer- Reviewed Publications:

Recent Journal Articles

  • Borjian, A., Muñoz de Cote, L. M., van Dijk, S., Houde, P. (2016). Transnational Children in Mexico: Context of Migration and Adaptation, Diaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education, Volume 10, Issue 1, Pages 42-54. DOI: 10.1080/15595692.2015.1084920
  • Borjian, A. (2015). Obstacles to Learning English in Mexico. CATESOL Journal, Volume 27, Issue 1, Pages 163-173.
  • Borjian, A. & Padilla A. (2010). Voices from Mexico:  How U.S. teachers can meet the needs of immigrant students. The Urban Review, Volume 42, Issue 4, Pages 316-328.

Recent Book Chapters

  • Borjian, A. (2015). Learning About Undocumented Students: Methodological and Practical Implications. In M. Lengeling and I. Mora Pablo (Eds.), Perspectives on Qualitative Research: Selection of articles from the Fifth International Qualitative Conference (pp. 469-485). Mexico: University of Guanajuato Press.
  • Borjian, A. (2015).  Linguistic Rights and the Realities of Transnational Students. Comunicación Social: Retos y Perspectivas, In Ruiz Miyares L., Muñoz Alvarado A., Álvarez Silva M. R., Pérez Joa Y. y Daileen Jackson Rodríguez (eds.), Comunicación Social: Retos y Perspectivas, pp. 31-33, Santiago de Cuba: Ediciones Centro de Lingüística Aplicada, ISBN: 978-959-7174-30-1.
  • Borjian, A. (2013).  Three Stories from the City: Interpretations and Analysis of Teaching and Learning, In M. Lengeling, I. Mora Pablo, & J. A. Shanahan (Eds.), Qualitative Research and Interpretation: Selection of articles from the Third International Qualitative Conference(pp. 325-349). Mexico: University of Guanajuato Press.

Courses Taught:

Credential

  • EED 701 Historical Foundations of Education
  • EED 737 Social Studies in Elemntary Classrooms
  • EED 749 Second Language Acquisition
  • EED 783 Learning Theories
  • EED 882 K-12 Literacy

MA

  • EED 720 Research Practices in Language and Literacy
  • EED 763 Technology in Education
  • EED 869 Developing Reading and Writing

Doctoral

  • EDDL 920 Developing Academic Skills for ELLs

Current Projects:

  • Binational Research Between Mexican and U.S. Educators
  • Academically Successful Undocumented College Students: Cases of Resilience
  • Developing Culturally Responsive Teachers
  • Impact of Parents’ Deportation on Children
  • Bilingual Mexican Teachers

 

Picture of Marguerite Conrad
Position:
Assistant Professor
Phone
415-338-1309
Biography:
Position:
Placement Coordinator/Lecturer
Phone
415 338-3415
Biography:

Diane Garfield has been with the Department of Elementary Education for more than 25 years.  She worked as a fifth grade teacher in the San Francisco Unified School District and then began teaching in the Multiple Subject Credential Program half time, while maintaining her career as a classroom teacher.  She retired from SFUSD in 2010 and continued on as the Placement Coordinator, teaching various courses, and advising and supervising student teachers.  Her area of focus has been on mathematics education in the elementary classroom, working to empower teachers to make mathematics relevant to students, thus empowering them to develop true competency and discover the love and power of the subject.

Education:

  • B.A. Sociology, San Francisco State University
  • M.A. Early Childhood Education, San Francisco State University
     

Certification:

  • National Board Certified Teacher (2001-2021)

 

Picture of Mina Kim
Position:
Associate Professor
Phone
415-405-0906
Biography:

Mina Kim, Associate Professor of Elementary Education at San Francisco State University, has an established expertise in the field of Early Childhood Education. She is a coordinator of the undergraduate ECE courses for prospective teachers and co- coordinating the Early Childhood Education (ECE) master program at SF State. She holds a B.A. in Child Development & Education, a M.S. in Early Childhood Education, and a Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction. She has participated in multiple presentations and has many publications focused on issues of early childhood curriculum development, paying specific attention to teacher action research, issues of math and science instruction, multicultural perspectives, and integrated play based curriculum in cross cultural contexts. She has served as a co-chair of ECE Interest Group at Action Research Network of the Americas (ARNA) for the past three years. She has served on two early childhood teacher education journal editorial boards, in which she reviews articles related to educational action research, integrated math & science curriculum and multicultural education.

Picture of SF State Logo
Position:
Associate Professor
Phone
415-338-7288
Biography:

Dr. Christy Lao is currently an Associate Professor of Education, former founding Director of the Confucius Institute (CI) at San Francisco State University (SFSU), Principal Investigator and Director of four major federal projects_ (1) Bay Area National Professional Development Project for English Language Learner (USED), (2) Project Chili: Chinese Literacy Instructional Materials & Curriculum Development (USED), (3) STARTALK Teacher Training Program, and (4) STARTALK Student Program at SFSU (NSA).

Dr. Lao received her Ph.D. from University of Southern California, in Second Language Acquisition.  As the founding director of CI at SFSU, Dr. Lao initiated, negotiated and established the first CI on the West Coast in 2005.  Dr. Lao received $3 million in federal funding to conduct research, develop English and Chinese bilingual curriculum and materials for elementary school, and provide professional development to Chinese bilingual teachers in the area of English and Chinese as a second language. Dr. Christy Lao also teaches in the Chinese Bilingual Teaching Credential Program at the Graduate School of Education at SFSU with a focus on Chinese language pedagogy and Chinese literacy development.

Dr. Lao has published widely in the field of second language acquisition focusing on English and Chinese bilingual learners.  Her most recent book is Comprehensible and Compelling: The Causes and Effects of Free Voluntary Reading (with Stephen Krashen and Syying Lee).

Previously, she was a faculty member at Teachers College, Columbia University and at Hong Kong Baptist University. For the past 20 years, she has worked with Chinese Bilingual schools and teachers in the San Francisco Bay Area, New York, Hong Kong and China.

Dr. Lao’s recent international professional collaborations have included projects with Centre for Advancement of Chinese Language Education and Research, The University of Hong Kong; Centre for Enhancing English Learning and Teaching, The Chinese University of Hong Kong; and Graduate Institute of Children’s Literature, National Taitung University, Taiwan.

 

Picture of Daniel Meier
Position:
Professor
Phone
415-338-3417
Biography:

I received my B.A. in English in 1982 from Wesleyan University, my Ed.M. from Harvard University in 1984, and my Ph.D. in Language and Literacy from the University of California at Berkeley in 1994. I have taught in the Department of Elementary Education at San Francisco State University since 1997. I teach classes on English Language Arts Development (K-3), Narrative Inquiry and Memoir, First and Second Language and Literacy Learning, M.A. Culminating Experience, International Education, and I supervise student teachers. I teach both in the M.A. Program in Early Childhood Education and also the Multiple Subject Credential Program. Along with Dr. Barbara Henderson, I am Co-Coordinator of the M.A. Early Childhood Program.

My research interests are in the areas of teacher research, language and literacy learning, and narrative. I am active as an elementary school and preschool teacher in the Berkeley Unified School District.

Publications:
All books are available through Teachers College Press at http://www.teacherscollegepress.com/

  • Meier, D. (in press). (Ed.). The power of stories: Using narrative to promote children’s language and literacy learning.New York: Teachers College Press.
  • Meier, D. and Henderson, B. (2007). Understanding children: The art and science of teacher research. New York: Teachers College Press.
  • Meier, D. (2004). The young child’s memory for words — First and second language and literacy. New York: Teachers College Press.
  • Meier, D. (2000). Scribble scrabble: Learning to read and write — Success with diverse teachers, children, and families.New York: Teachers College Press.
  • Meier, D. (2007). Learning in small moments: Life in an urban classroom. Practitioner Inquiry Series. New York: Teachers College Press.

Co-Editor:
Voices of Practitioners, online feature showcasing teacher research in early childhood education. Co-Editor with Dr. Barbara Henderson. National Association for the Education of Young Children. Go tohttp://www.naeyc.org/publications/vop for submission guidelines and you can also contact me via email regarding questions about article submission.

 

Picture of Isabel Quita
Position:
Professor
Phone
415-338-3416
Biography:

Educational Background

  • Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1997; emphases on Elementary Science Education, and the Cultural and Linguistic Aspects of how Multicultural Children Understands Science Concepts and Phenomena.
  • M.Ed, University of the Philippines – Diliman, 1991; Major in Biology and Science Education

 

An empowered teacher is a learner who is an inquisitive thinker and a reflective decision maker. One who learns and investigates the teaching-learning process. I view learning as a construction and teaching process. This process facilitates development.

 

As an advocate of a constructivist approach to a teacher's education, I believe in teaching that emphasizes learners to be actively involved in making sense of information and experiences—to reflect on their learning as well as to connect classroom experiences with real life situations.

 

Research and Teaching Interests

  • Science Education for culturally and linguistically diverse students in elementary schools
  • Inquiry-based science / Interdisciplinary approach to teaching science to elementary school children
  • Informal Science Education (i.e. science museum / discovery learning centers, etc.)
  • How elementary school children conceptualize science concepts and phenomena
  • How student teachers perceive themselves as teachers and learners during student teaching experiences
  • Integrating technology in science teaching and learning

 

Publications

  • Quita, Isabel. (Fall 2003). What is a Scientist? Perspectives of Teachers of Color.
  • Multicultural Education, vol. II, Number 1.
  • Quita, Isabel N. (February 2002). Interpreting A Filipino Elementary
  • Student's Ideas Of Force And Motion: A Case Study. Journal of Interdisciplinary Education, North America Chapter, volume 5. World Council for Curriculum and Instruction.
  • Quita, Maria Isabel. (Summer 2000). The Challenges in Elementary Science Teaching and Learning in the 21st Century. In College of Education: Review, San Francisco State University, vol. 12.
  • Nicdao-Quita, Ma. Isabel. (1997). An exploratory case study of elementary students’ main explanatory approaches to science concepts and their states of mental engagements. Doctoral dissertation, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign. (# 9737207 00002) Ann Arbor, MI: UMI Publications.
Picture of Stephanie Sisk-Hilton
Position:
Associate Professor
Phone
415-338-1747
Biography:

Stephanie Sisk-Hilton is an Associate Professor in the Department of Elementary Education.  Her teaching and research focuses on the intersections of children’s science learning, cognition and development, and collaborative teacher learning.  Her current research focuses on how young children can come to understand and use challenging science concepts when they are engaged in pedagogically ambitious approaches to teaching and learning.  She has also done extensive research into how teachers develop and share science teaching knowledge through collaborative professional development.

At SFSU, Stephanie co-coordinates the intensive one-year Multiple Subjects Teaching Credential Program as well as the MA in Elementary Education for recent credential graduates.  Her departmental work focuses on building teaching and learning partnerships between the teacher education program and the elementary schools that mentor future teachers to work with diverse learners.

Stephanie received certification through the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards and has taught elementary and middle school in Prince George’s County, MD, Atlanta, GA, Brooklyn, NY, and Oakland, CA.  She is still an active teacher of elementary school science as part of her ongoing research.  She has also worked extensively as a teacher professional developer dealing with school-wide curriculum reform and with science curriculum and pedagogy.  She is the author of Teaching and Learning in Public: Professional Development Through Shared Inquiry (Teachers College Press).

Education

  • Ph.D., Cognition and Development (Education in Math, Science, and Technology), University of California, Berkeley, 2005.
  • MA, Education Policy and Administration, Stanford University, 1997
  • BA, Cognitive Science, Johns Hopkins University, 1993.

Selected Publications

  • Meier, D., and Sisk-Hilton, S., eds. (2013). Nature Education with Young Children: Integrating Inquiry and Practice.  New York: Routledge.
  • Metz, K., Sisk-Hilton, S., Berson, E., and Li, U. (2010) Scaffolding Children's Understanding of the Fit Between Organisms and their Environment In the Context of the Practices of Science.  In K. Gomez, L. Lyons, & J. Radinsky (Eds.), Learning in the Disciplines: Proceedings of the International Conference of the Learning Sciences (ICLS). International Society of the Learning Sciences: Chicago, IL.
  • Sisk-Hilton, S. (2009). Teaching and Learning In Public: Professional Development Through Shared Inquiry.  Teachers College Press, New York, NY.

 

Picture of Maria Zavala
Position:
Assistant Professor
Email
Phone
415-405-0465
Biography:

Dr. Zavala is a mathematics educator teaching in the multiple-subjects credential program, Bilingual Education for Social Transformation (BEST) Spanish bilingual program, and special education program as well as graduate courses in the masters program for Mathematics Education.

 

Dr. Zavala joined the faculty at SFSU after completing her PhD in Mathematics Education with a focus on the Learning Sciences at the University of Washington Seattle. Her dissertation focused on the mathematics identity development of Latino/a students and is titled Race, Language, and Opportunities to Learn: The Mathematics Identity Negotiation of Latino/a Youth.  Many years prior she earned a BA in Mathematics from University of California Santa Cruz.

 

Dr. Zavala brings a variety of teaching experiences in mathematics and literacy from across the K-college pipeline to her work. She has been working in teacher education as an instructor and leader of professional development for a number of years.  Her research focuses on equity issues in the mathematics education of Latino/as and other historically marginalized populations by focusing on identity develop and culturally responsive practices. Her newest research project is Culturally Responsive Practices of Bilingual Pre-service Teachers: Lessons from a Teacher Education Program focused on Education for Social Transformations, and is in collaboration with other BEST faculty.

 

Links to Selected Publications:

Secondary Education (SED)

Picture of Nathan Avani
Position:
Professor
Phone
415-338-6442
Biography:

Education Background

  • Michigan State University, Ph.D. Educational Psychology
  • Western Michigan University, M.A. Educational Leadership
  • Western Michigan University, B.S. Business/ Business Education
  • Kellogg Community College, A.A. Computer Programming
  • Licenses: Michigan Department of Education
    • Grades 6-8 all subjects (Permanent Credential)
    • Grades 9-12 Business Education/Economics/Accounting (Permanent Credential)
    • Full Vocational Authorization in Accounting and Computing/Computer Programming and Computer Operations

Dr. Avani completed his Ph.D. in Educational Psychology in 1985 from Michigan State University. Dr. Avani has been a high school teacher, a community college instructor, an administrator on the staff with the Michigan Department of Education and, an international consultant and field specialist for the USAID - United States Aide For International Development. Dr. Avani was a Professor at Lehman College of the City University of New York from 1986-2002. He was Chair of the Department of Middle and High School Education at Lehman College from 1998-2002. Dr. Avani is currently Professor of Educational Psychology in the Department of Secondary Education at San Francisco State University, San Francisco, California. Dr. Avani was Chair of the Department of Secondary Education from 2002-2014. Dr. Avani is a former member of the Board of Directors of the International Mentoring Association (IMA) and its Past-President. Dr. Avani is an elected member of the National Council of the American Association of University Professors, AAUP. Dr. Avani's research focus is in the area of mentoring. Other areas of interest are school reform, small school development, and technology in education.


Keynote Addresses

Dr.Nathan Avani delivered the keynote address at the Association of Teacher Educators 2009 Summer Conference in Reno, Nev., Aug. 1-5, 2009 Title of address:  “Changing the World Through Mentoring—One Teacher at a Time!”

Dr. Nathan Avani gave the Keynote Address at the World Council for Curriculum and Instruction (WCCI) North American Chapter's Biennial Conference held at the Clarion Hotel, San Francisco California, October 13-15, 2005. Title of address:  “Activism in the Professions:  An Individual’s Journey of Caring.”


Publications

  • 2001    YouthLink - Developing Effective Mentoring Programs, (Facilitator's Guide) The Bureau For At-Risk Youth, 135 Dupont Street, P.O. Box 760 Plainview, New York, 11803 (Copyright 2001)
  • 2001    YouthLink - Developing Effective Mentoring Programs, (Youth Workbook) The Bureau For At-Risk Youth, 135 Dupont Street, P.O. Box 760 Plainview, New York, 11803 (Copyright 2001). 

  • l998     MENTORING WORKS! A Peer Helping Program For Middle and High School Students (Facilitator's Guide) The Bureau For At-Risk Youth, 135 Dupont Street, P.O. Box 760 Plainview, New York 11803 (Copyright 1998).
  • l998     MENTORING WORKS! A Peer Helping Program For Middle and High School Students (Student Workbook)      The Bureau For At-Risk Youth, 135 Dupont Street, P.O. Box 760 Plainview, New York 11803 (Copyright 1998).
     

Book Chapters

  • Avani, Nathan (2002) Parents Mentoring Parents for School Success, The Human and Organizational Dimensions of Successful Mentoring Programs and Relationships. Information Age Publishing, Inc., Dr. Frances Kochan, Editor Auburn University, Alabama  
  • Avani, N., & Kell, J. ( 2007). Moving from the informal to the formal: A mentoring process for tenure-track faculty and lecturers. The Handbook of Formal Mentoring in Higher Education: A Case Study Approach (Christopher-Gordon Publishers, C. A. Mullen, editor)
  • Avani, Nathan (2007). Journal of Interdisciplinary Education . Activism in the Professions: An Individual’s Journey of Caring, WCCI North American Chapter.

Journals

Moving toward a Research Agenda: Key Questions for Teacher Educators on the Role and Impact of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. Written by Dr. Annette Digby and Dr. Nathan Avani, Issues in Teacher Preparation, A Journal of the California Council on Teacher Education Education, Volume 12, Number 1, Spring 2003.

An Interview with Dr. Nathan Avani, Electronic Journal, The Guidance Channel, September 2000,http://www.guidance-group.com


Published Conference Proceedings

  • Avani, Nathan T., Horvath, Larry (2011, January 3-10). Paper/Poster presentation “Using          TASKSTREAM for Success:” Passing the Performance Assessment for California Teachers for Candidates in Secondary Education, 9th Annual Hawaii International Conference on Education, Waikiki, Hawaii.
  • Avani, Nathan T. (2010, January 6-10). Paper/poster presentation “Changing The World Through Mentoring – One Teacher at a Time!”  8th Annual Hawaii International Conference on Education, Waikiki, Hawaii.
  • Avani, Nathan T. (2008, January 4-9). Paper/poster presentation “Student Teaching Supervision: Why Nobody Wants To Do It!” 6th Annual Hawaii International Conference on Education,      Waikiki, Hawaii.
  • Avani, Nathan T. (2007, March 22-24). Workshop Presentation “Developing Effective Community Based Mentor Programs.” 20th Annual International Mentoring Association Conference, Atlanta, Georgia.
  • Avani, Nathan T. (2007, January 5-9). Workshop presentation “Developing a Faculty Mentor      Program at the Department Level.” 5th Annual Hawaii International Conference on Education, Waikiki, Hawaii
  • Avani, Nathan T. (2006, January 6-9). Workshop presentation “Candidate Assessment Portfolio – Going Digital and Growing Your Own.” 4th Annual Hawaii International Conference on Education, Waikiki, Hawaii
  • Avani, Nathan T. (2005, January 4-7). Workshop presentation “Developing Effective Mentoring Programs.” 3rd Annual Hawaii International Conference on Education, Waikiki, Hawaii
  • Avani, Nathan T. (2000,March 30-April 1). GEAR UP - Parent and Student Mentor Models. 12th International Mentoring Conference, New Orleans, LA

Grants

  • Bronx Educational Alliance (BEA) GEARUP Grant PI: Dr. Marietta Saravia-Shore, Dr. Nathan Avani - Mentor Coordinator, 1999-2004, $7,320,000 (five-year grant)
  • Middle School Initiative (MSI), Lehman College and District #5 - Member of grant team from Institute for Literacy Studies, $150,000. - Grant Funded by New York City Board of Education 1997-1998.
  • Middle School Initiative (MSI), Lehman College and District #9 - Member of grant team from Institute for Literacy Studies, $150,000. - Grant Funded by New York City Board of Education l996-1997.
  • Bronx Scholars Program, Lehman College/Roosevelt High School Co-Principal Investigator with Victoria Herrick, Guidance Counselor, Roosevelt High School, Bronx, New York.  Grant funded by NYNEX $33,000. - l995-l997.
  • Stay-in-School Partnership Program: Lehman/Clinton Reservoir Program Co-Principal Investigator with Professor Russell Bradshaw. 1988-1989, $100,000.
  • Stay-in School Partnership Program: Lehman/Clinton Reservoir Program Co-Principal Investigator with Professor Russell Bradshaw.  Grant renewal - written with Professors Ann Haas and Frances Tobin, Health Services 1989-1990 $80,000.
  • Stay-in School Partnership Program: Lehman/Clinton Reservoir Program Co-Principal Investigator with Professor Russell Bradshaw. Grant renewal - written with Professors Ann Haas and Frances Tobin, Health Services 1990-1991 $100,000.
  • Research team member (Nathan Avani, Russell Bradshaw, Mary Shepard and Shirley Walker).  CUNY/BOE Student Mentor Program. Funded and sponsored by CUNY. 1991-1992, $4,000.00.
  • Research team member (Nathan Avani, Russell Bradshaw, Mary Shepard and Shirley Walker). 
CUNY/BOE Student Mentor Program. Funded and sponsored by CUNY. 1990-1991, $4,000.00.
  • College Discovery and Development Program (CDDP) - Grant funded through CUNY Collaborative: summer 1992, $19,874.
  • College Discovery and Development Program (CDDP) - Grant funded through CUNY Collaborative: spring 1991, $16,116.
  • College Discovery and Development Program (CDDP) - Grant funded through CUNY Collaborative: summer 1990, $15,000.

Community Service

  • Elected Board Member - 2000 - New York University Medical Center and Bellevue Hospital Adult HIV/AIDS CAB (Community Advisory Board) 2-year term Elected to National Advisory Council, Washington D.C. 2001.
  • AIDS Group Leader and therapist 1992-2000 GHHC - Gay Men's Health Crisis, NYC.
  • Career Day Speaker, Roosevelt High School, Bronx, New York April 10, 1999.
  • Birch Services Summer Camp Counselor Children With AIDS August l996, 1997.
  • Bronx Teacher Development Day Workshop Leader November l994.
  • New York City AIDS Walk - Sponsor and Participant - 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 200.
  • Graduation/Awards Presentation Speaker - South Bronx Job Corps Center - Bronx, New York 10453, April 26, 1988.
  • Bronx Teacher Development Day Workshop Leader November l994.
  • New York City AIDS Walk - Sponsor and Participant - 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 200.
  • Graduation/Awards Presentation Speaker - South Bronx Job Corps Center - Bronx, New York 10453, April 26, 1988.
  • St. Gabriel's Church - Program for the homeless - Concourse House - Bronx, New York, winter 1987, 1988.
  • Career Day Speaker - Macombs Community Junior High School 82 - Bronx, New York  10453, October 7, 1986.

 

Image of Gilda Bloom
Position:
Assistant Professor
Phone
415-338-7060
Biography:
  • B.S.  Bowling Green State University
  • M.A. San Jose State University
  • A.M. Stanford University
  • Ph.D. Stanford University
Picture of Dr. Jamal Cook
Position:
Professor
Phone
415-338-2065
Biography:

Dr. Jamal Cooks, originally from Oakland, CA.,is a tenured, Professor at San Francisco State University in the Department of Secondary Education. Dr. Cooks has taught middle and high school social studies, community college English, and teacher education courses at the university level. He earned his B.A. from University of California at Berkeley and a MA in Social Studies Curriculum Development from the University of Michigan. Dr. Cooks completed his Ph.D. at the University of Michigan with a dissertation entitled "Explicit Instruction, assumed skills, or something in the middle: Expository writing development in different learning environments with high school freshmen." Moreover, he is an award winning track and field coach. Dr. Cooks has coached many indoor and outdoor, track club and high school state participants and All Americans. Dr. Cooks is a certified Level 2 coach in sprints, jumps, hurdles, and relays and was a participant in the Emerging Elite Coaches Camp in Chula Vista at the U.S. Olympic Training Center.
 
Education
•    1996-2002          Ph.D.,The University Of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.
•    1995-1996          MA.,The University Of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.
•    1993-1995          Teaching Credential, California State University-Hayward, Hayward, CA.
•    1989-1993          B.A.,The University Of California At Berkeley, Berkeley, CA.
 

Professional Experience
•    2008-present       Professor, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA.
•    2008-2016          Author, Houghton Mifflin/ Harcourt Company, Boston, MA.
•    2011-2012          Visiting Associate Professor, Mills College, Oakland, CA.
•    2009-2010          National Urban Alliance, San Francisco, Syosset, NY.
•    2002-2008          Assistant Professor, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA.
•    2001-2004          Visiting Professor, University Of California-at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA.
•    2000-2002          Instructor/Lecturer, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA.
•    2000-2002          Instructor, Peralta Community College System, Oakland, CA.
•    1995-2000          Graduate Assistant/ Research Assistant, Ann Arbor, MI.
•    1993-1995          Teacher- King Estates Junior High School, Oakland, CA.
 

Honors & Awards
•    2016                        All East Bay Coach of the Year- Finalist, Oakland, CA.
•    2014                        National Council of Teachers of English- Honorary Chair, Boston, MA
•    2013                        Center for Scholastic Inquiry- Best Paper, Scottsdale, AZ
•    2012                        All East Bay Coach of the Year- Winner, Oakland, CA.
•    2010            Top 20 Most Influential Education Professors, San Francisco, CA.
 

Publication

Referred Journal Articles (select few)
•    Brown, B., Cooks, J. & Cross, K. (2015). Changing the game in STEM: Cultural hybridity discourse and learning. Science Education
•    Cooks, J. & Sunseri, A. (2014). Leveling the playing field: The efficacy of thinking maps on English language learner student’s writing. Article submitted to The TESOL Journal.
•    Nasir, N, and Cooks, J. (2009). Track Literacy: Learning to run and becoming a runner. Anthropology and Education, 40, 1, 41-61.
•    Fleming, D., Unrau, D., Cooks, J., Davis, J., Farnan, H., and Grisham, D. (2007). Enhancing Single Subject Reading Courses: Recommendations and Resources from the Single Subject Reading Task Force (SSRTF). Teacher 
Education Quarterly, 34, 3, 5-17.
•    Cooks, J. (2004). Writing for Something: The nexus among raps, essays, and expository organizational patterns of African American Adolescents. English Journal, 94,1,72-76.
•    Cooks, J. & Epstein, T. (2000). Dissin’ democracy? African American adolescents’ concepts of citizenship. Journal of Social Studies Research, 24, 10-20.
•    Cooks, J. (1998). Let’s get it started: Teaching teachers how to implement a culturally relevant pedagogy. Trotter Review, Fall, 43-45.
•    Ball, A., Williams, J., & Cooks, J. (1997). An Ebonics-based curriculum: The educational value. Thought and Action, 8(2), 39-50.
 

Book Chapters
•    Jocson, K. and Cooks, J. (2011). Popular Culture and Teaching. Critical Perspectives on Education in Urban Settings by Valerie Kinloch.
•    Cooks, J. and Ball, A. (2009). Research on the Literacies of African American Vernacular English Speaking Adolescents. In Handbook of Adolescent Literacy Research by L. Christenbury, R. Bomer, and P.Smagorinsky, 140-152.
 

In Review
•    Cooks, J., and Perry, T. (in review). Popular Culture and Literacy for Educators. Book proposal submitted to Peter Lang.
•    Cooks, J. and Sunseri, A. (in review) Leveling the Playing Field: The Efficacy of Thinking Maps on English Language Learner Student’s Writing. Article submitted to The TESOL Journal.
•    Cooks, J. and Lord-Walker, J. (in review). Bringing it Back Home: Exploring the Benefits of an African Centered Education for Urban Students. Article submitted to Urban Education.
•    Cooks, J., Allender, D., and Irvine, P. (in review). Pathways to literacies across the content areas: Teaching pre- credential teachers how to use an innovative online website to build literacy skills in the 21st century. Article submitted to CITE.
•    Cooks, J. and Cooks, C. (in review). Plugging the holes: Issues that impact a successful after school tutorial program. THE FORUM, the International Journal of the World Council for Curriculum and Instruction.
•    Cooks, J. (in review). Stepping to the B Side: Academic Experiences of African Americans in Doctoral Programs. The Journal for Scholastic Inquiry.

 

Grants
 
•     National Science Foundation –2014                       $899,000.00 (not funded)
•     San Francisco State University –2014                    $7,000.00
•     San Francisco State University –2013                    $4,000.00
•     National Science Foundation #1003589 –2012      $899,000.00
•     San Francisco State University –2011                    $7,000.00

Image of Yanan Fan
Position:
Associate Professor
Phone
415-338-1972
Biography:

Educational Background

  • Michigan State University, 2006, Ph.D. in Curriculum, Teaching, and Educational Policy (concentration: Second Language Literacy)
  • Beijing Normal University, 2000, M.A. in English Literature (concentration: Teaching of English as a Second/Foreign Language)
  • Shanghai International Studies University, 1995, Fulbright Graduate Fellow, in American Studies
  • Capital Normal University (Beijing), 1992, B.A. in English Literature

Dr. Yanan Fan is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Secondary Education. She studies literacy learning of immigrant adolescents and teacher education. She started her work in language education in 1992, as a teacher of English in Beijing, China. After obtaining a Master's Degree in Teaching English as a Foreign Language from Beijing Normal University, she worked with secondary teachers and students in Michigan. Dr. Fan completed her doctoral degree in Teacher Education in 2006 from Michigan State University, and joined the faculty at San Francisco State the same year. Her major research interests are related to the social and cultural processes of second language literacy. She has examined how immigrant students negotiate language and academic demands, as well as the social and identity issues of adolescence amid the linguistic, socioeconomic, and cultural complexities of central city schools. She has also published studies of language learning and teaching experiences of teacher candidates.


Selected Publications

  • Peer Reviewed Journal Articles
  • Fan, Y. & Han, X. (2012).The teacher’s stories at a Chinese maintenance school. New Waves: Educational Research and Development, 15, 46-61.
  • Fan, Y. (2009). Lost in institution: Learning to write in Midwestern urban mainstream classrooms. Journal of Southeast Asian American Education & Advancement, 4, 1-17.
  • Fan, Y. (2009). How mainstream teachers learn from ELL students. Essential Teacher (TESOL), 6, 31-33.
  • Fan, Y. (2008). When English Language Learners Write: Connecting Research to Practice, K-8. Book Review. Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, 8, 116-119.
  • Fan, Y. (2008). Building a community of love: What can teachers learn from Vietnamese immigrant students. International Journal of Interdisciplinary Education, 8, 228-240.
  • Fan, Y. & Han, X. (2007). Negotiating the English language and researcher role: A reflection of two NNESTs. Nonnative English Speakers in TESOL (NNEST) Caucus Newsletter, 9, 2-4.
  • Fan, Y. & Han, M. (2000). Assessing listening competence in China’s National Matriculation English Examination. Foreign Language Teaching In Schools, 23, 8-11.
  • Fan, Y. (1999). Exploring teaching and learning English with word processors at college. Foreign Languages and Their Teaching, 125, 172-173.
  • Peer-Reviewed Book Chapters
  • Fan, Y. (2011) Negotiating languages and practices: Field experience of a pre-service high school teacher of Chinese. In Rong, X. L. & Endo, R. (Eds.). Asian American Education – Asian American Identities, Racial Issues, and Languages (pp. 181-200). Greenwich, CT: Information Age Publishing.
  • Fan, Y. (1998). Scaffolding EFL writing: Classroom activities in a computer-assisted composition class. In Liang, Y (Ed.). Selected articles of foreign language teaching and research (pp. 33-40). Beijing: World Books Press.
  • Books
  • Fan, Y. & Qin, A. (2001). Those happy times: Selected English reading passages for EFL high school students. Beijing: Beijing Publishing House.
  • Fan, Y. & Zhang, C. (1997). Tourism English. Beijing: Tourism Education Press. 
  • Edited Book
  • Liu, X. & Fan, Y. (Eds.) (2000). Guide to spoken English test of National College Entrance Examination in China. Changchun: Jilin Educational Press.

Grants

California State University Mini Grant, 2011-2012.

TESOL (Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages) Professional Development Scholarship, 2010.

California State University Faculty Affirmative Action Grant, 2009.

Community Scholarship Faculty Grant, 2008 – 2010.

Faculty International Development Grant, 2007.

California State University Faculty Affirmative Action Grant, 2007.

California State University Summer Stipend, 2006.

 

Position:
Assistant Professor
Phone
415-338-1534
Biography:
Image of Larry Horvath
Position:
Associate Professor
Phone
415-338-2693
Biography:

EDUCATION


2008                      Ph.D., University of California, Davis, CA. Science Education

1994                      M.A., San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA.  Secondary Education

1984                      B.A., University of California, Davis, CA. Zoology

 

PROFESSIONAL CREDENTIALS, LICENSES AND CERTIFICATIONS


1986                      Single Subject Clear Credential, Life Science, Sonoma State University, Rohnert Park, CA.

 

Dr. Horvath earned his Ph.D. in Science Education in 2008 from the University of California, Davis. He has taught middle school science and high school Biology and Chemistry for thirteen years in California and internationally. His research interests include the teaching and learning of science through inquiry and the development of STEM teacher leaders committed to careers in urban schools. Dr. Horvath is currently the lead science faculty member at the San Francisco State University Center for Science and Math Education (CSME).

 

PUBLICATIONS


BOOK CHAPTERS – PUBLISHED

 

Horvath, L. & Marshall, J. (2014, September 7). The Natural Sciences: Understanding the Natural World. Chapter in Marshall, J. & Donahue, D., Art-Centered Learning Across the Curriculum: Integrating Contemporary Art in the Secondary School Classroom. Teacher’s College Press.

 

 

PRESENTATIONS JURIED

 

Horvath, L., Keller, J. & Nelson, F., Digrius, D., & Coble C. (2015, June 3). Recruiting and Preparing STEM Teachers through Partnerships and Engagement in Mathematical, Scientific, and Engineering Practices. Roundtable presentation at the APLU Science and Mathematics Teacher Imperative National Conference, New Orleans, Louisiana.

 

Horvath, L., Brownstein, E., & Whittaker A. (2015, January 9). Bringing Together the NGSS, edTPA and Science Teacher Preparation: A Roundtable with Seasoned Implementers. Roundtable presentation at the Association of Science Teacher Educators International Conference, Portland, OR.

 

Horvath, L.  & Avani N. (2014, October 25). Transitioning from the PACT to the edTPA: What do we Gain and what do we Lose? Presentation at the 2014 PACT and edTPA Implementation Conference, Los Angeles, CA.

 

Bissell, J., Nelson, F., Ellis, M., Keller, J. & Horvath, L. (2014, June 4). California State University (CSU) and the New Standards: Partnerships supporting the CCCSS, NGSS and College and Career Readiness Standards. CSU panel presentation at the APLU Science and Mathematics Teacher Imperative National Conference, Milwaukee, WI.

 

Horvath, L., Chan, J. & Chau, D., Russo-Tait, T., & Evans, A. (2013, November 18). Educators, Equity, Enrichment: STEM Ed at San Francisco State. Presentation at the California STEM Symposium, Sacramento, CA.

 

Horvath, L. Marshall J. (2013, February 8). Science, Art and the Four Dimensions of Understanding. Workshop presented at the Contra Costa Office of Education Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Mathematics (STEAM) Colloquium, San Ramon, CA

 

Keller, J., Bonsangue, M., Andrews, D., & Horvath, L. (2012, June 7). Robert Noyce Scholarship Programs: Promising Strategies for Promoting Science and Mathematical Teacher Quality in Recruitment, Preparation, Mentoring/Induction and Professional Development. CSU panel presentation at the APLU Science and Mathematics Teacher Imperative National Conference, Alexandria, VA.

 

Horvath, L. (2012, June 7). The San Francisco State Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program: Preparing STEM Teacher Leaders and Researchers. Poster presented at the APLU Science and Mathematics Teacher Imperative National Conference, Alexandria, VA.

 

Horvath, L. & Avani, N. (2012, March 30). Embedding the Performance Assessment for California Teachers (PACT) in Secondary Education at San Francisco State University: Using “TASKSTREAM” for credential candidate support in successfully completing the TPA and to inform program improvement. Paper presented at the California Council on Teacher Education Spring Conference, San Jose, CA.

 

Horvath, L. (2012, January 6). The STEM Summer Institute: Opening the STEM Teaching Pathway for     Community College Students. Group roundtable presentation at the Association of Science Teacher Educators Conference, Clearwater Beach, FL.

 

Avani, N. & Horvath, L. (2011, January 7). “Using TASKSTREAM for Success:” Passing the Performance Assessment for California Teachers for Candidates in Secondary Education. Poster presentation at the 9th Annual Hawaii International Conference on Education, Waikiki, HI

 

Horvath, L. (2010, January 15). Prospective science teacher’s perspectives on inquiry in the context of engaging in summer research internships. Poster presented at the Association of Science Teacher Educators Conference, Sacramento, CA.

 

Horvath, L. & Passmore, C. (2008, April 2). Pre-service science teachers’ construction of inquiry in the context of planning and teaching inquiry-based lessons.  Paper presented at the National Association of Research in Science Teaching Conference, Baltimore, Md.

 

Horvath, L. & Passmore, C. (2008, January 11). Tangled up in inquiry: Pre-service science teachers changing perspectives on inquiry in the context of planning and teaching inquiry-based lessons.  Paper presented at the Association of Science Teacher Educators Conference, St. Louis, MO.

 

PRESENTATIONS NON-JURIED

 

Horvath, L. (2014, June 19). The San Francisco State Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program. Poster presented at the Eighth Annual NSF Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program, Washington, DC.

 

Horvath, L., Sessoms, D. & Grant, M. (2014, May 5). Embedding the NGSS in Teacher Preparation Programs. Presentation and Workshop at the CSU Regional Professional Learning Meeting on Educator Preparation held at Sacramento State University, Sacramento, CA.

 

Horvath, L. & Marshall J. (2013, October 9). Science and Art and the Four Dimensions of Understanding. Workshop presented for the Bay Area Writing Project at the Chabot Space and Science Center, Oakland, CA.

 

Horvath, L. (2013, May 30). The San Francisco State Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program. Poster presented at the Eighth Annual NSF Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program, Washington, DC.

 

Horvath, L. (2012, May 24). The San Francisco State Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program. Poster presented at the Seventh Annual NSF Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program, Washington, DC.

 

Horvath, L.  & Avani N. (2011, October 20). Using PACT data for program improvement. Presentation at the 2011 PACT/TPAC Implementation Conference, San Diego, CA

 

Horvath, L., Avani, N., Nelson, C. & Felton, M. (2010, November 4). Ramping up Quickly: Engaging faculty and staff with the PACT. Presentation at the 2010 PACT/TPAC Implementation Conference, San Diego, CA

 

Horvath, L. & Avani, N. (2009, October 22). Ramping up Quickly: “Living the Tipping Point.” Presentation at the 2009 PACT Implementation Conference, Santa Barbara, CA

 

WORKS SUBMITTED FOR PUBLICATION

 

Horvath, L. & Brownstein, E. (Submitted July 2015). Preservice Science Teacher’s Shifting Perspectives on Inquiry During Student Teaching. Journal of Science Teacher Education (JSTE).

 

WORKS IN PROGRESS

Horvath, L. & Brownstein, E.  The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and the edTPA: Evidence of engaging students in the practices of Inquiry. IRB protocol #E15-128.

 

Horvath, L. & Passmore, C. Preservice Science Teachers’ Construction of inquiry in the Context of Planning and Teaching Inquiry-based Lessons. Unpublished manuscript

 

Horvath, L. & Avani, N. Shifting to the edTPA in a California Context. Unpublished manuscript

 

GRANTS


2011 - 2016          PI San Francisco State Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program. Dr. Eric Hsu Mathematics and Dr. Adrienne Cool Physics and Astronomy, co-PIs.  $1,200,000. National Science Foundation

2013 - 2014           PI Western Region Noyce Initiative, subcontract with Fresno State University for planning and hosting Western Regional Noyce Conference in San Francisco, Fall 2014. $51,000. National Science Foundation

2013 – 2015          Co-PI Western Region Noyce Initiative. Dr. David Andrews, Fresno State PI with Dr. John Keller, Cal Poly SLO and Dr. Donna Ross, San Diego State Co-PIs. $1,400,000 National Science Foundation

2014 – 2017          Lead Professional Developer supporting the NGSS. Integrating Engineering and Technology with Math and Science (ITEAMS) Grant. Math and Science Partnership with San Rafael City Schools. PI Dr. Eric Hsu, San Francisco State University. $1,5000,000 California Department of Education

2012 – 2014          Lead Science Education Faculty, Foundational Level General Science Working Group. San Francisco State Center for Math and Science Education. $125,000    Bechtel Foundation

2009 – 2014          CSU Liaison for the STEM Teacher’s as Researchers (STAR) program. PI Dr. John Keller, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo Center for Excellence in Science and Math Education (CESaME). National Science Foundation

 

GRANTS PENDING


March 2015          PI Robert Noyce Track 3 grant proposal. Exceptional Teachers Require Exceptional Mentors Project: Elevating the Early Clinical Experiences of Secondary STEM Teachers. Dr. Eric Hsu Mathematics, SFSU, Dr. Adrienne Cool Physics and Astronomy, SFSU, Dr. Megan

 

CURRICULAR INNOVATIONS


Development team member and writer for the edTPA Secondary Science Assessment Handbook, Middle Level Science Assessment Handbook, and the Secondary and Middle Level Science Thinking Behind the Rubrics. Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning and Equity (SCALE) and Pearson publications.

 

HONORS & AWARDS


5/2015                   Invited by The Stanford Center for Assessment Learning and Equity (SCALE) and the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE) to join the edTPA National Academy as an Implementation Support Consultant

6/2013                   Outstanding Service Award for Leadership as the PACT Coordinator for Secondary Education presented by the San Francisco State University Department of Secondary Education, San Francisco, CA

10/2012                  Letter of commendation from the National Teacher Performance Assessment Consortium, Stanford University, for work with the Performance Assessment for California Teachers (PACT) and the National Teacher Performance Assessment (edTPA).

6/2007                   Award for Outstanding Leadership and Service to Education presented by the Graduate Group in Education, University of California, Davis, CA.

9/2001 – 6/2007      Block Grant Fellowships, School of Education, University of California, Davis, CA.

1/2007                   Graduate Studies Travel Grant, University of California, Davis, CA.

9/2006                   Graduate Teaching Fellowship, School of Education, University of California, Davis, CA.

7/2006                   Summer Research Fellowship, School of Education, University of California, Davis, CA.

1/2002 – 6/2006      Teacher Education Fellow, School of Education, University of California, Davis, CA.

 

PROFESSIONAL AND CIVIC ACTIVITIES


8/2014 – present      Invited to serve as a member of the edTPA National User’s Advisory Group, Stanford Center for Assessment, Learning and Equity (SCALE).

1/2012 – present      Collaborating researcher with Strategic Education Research Partnership (SERP) San Francisco and Oakland

9/2012 – 6/2013      Member of SED faculty working group to re-think the SFSU single subject teacher preparation program

1/2011 – 6/2013      Consultant and Instructor for the STEM Summer Institute at City College of San Francisco

9/2010 - present       Lead Science Faculty for the Center for Science and Math Education, San   Francisco State University

9/2010 – present      Consultant for the National Teacher Performance Assessment Consortium (TPAC), Stanford University

9/2010 – 6/2014      Served on the Area B Subcommittee for General Education Course Certification, San Francisco State University

9/2009 – present      Proposal reviewer for the annual Association of Science Teacher Educators International Conference

9/2009 – 1/2011      Served on the College of Education Sabbatical Committee, San Francisco State University

9/2009 – 12/2009     Served on the search committee for the Director of The Center for Science and Math Education, San Francisco State University

8/2009 – 6/2014      Served on the Teacher Credentialing Committee, San Francisco State University

6/2009 – 8/2013      CSU Liaison for the STEM Teachers’ as Researchers (STAR) program at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, San Francisco State University, Romberg Tiburon Center, and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

9/2008 – 6/2013      PACT Coordination and Support, Secondary Education, San Francisco State University        

10/2007 – 6/2011     Secondary Education representative on the College of Education NCATE Evaluation Committee, San Francisco State University.

9/2007 – 12/2008     Member of the California Science Teachers’ Conference Committee for the 2008 conference, San Jose, CA.

9/2007- 7/2008        Member of the Student Teaching Task Force, Secondary Education, San Francisco State University

9/2005 – present      Benchmarker and Trainer of Trainers for the Performance Assessment for California Teachers (PACT) Consortium, Stanford University

Picture of Judith Kysh
Position:
Professor
Phone
415-338-2121
Biography:

 

BACKGROUND:

Judith (Judy) Kysh came to San Francisco State in 2000.  She is a Professor in the Departments of Secondary Education and Mathematics.  Her research interests are in the areas of mathematics education, particularly classroom discourse, and in teacher research and school change.  She teaches graduate courses in mathematics education and research methods, credential courses for secondary mathematics teachers, and undergraduate mathematics courses for future teachers.

 

She began her work in math education in 1962, as a math teacher in the Tamalpais Union High School District, and then, with a UC Berkeley partnership program, worked with teachers and taught math at Elmhurst Junior High and Castlemont High in Oakland.  In 1982 she became the Director of the Northern California Mathematics Project at UC Davis, where she worked with K-14 teachers of mathematics in a variety of professional development, curriculum, assessment, and teacher research projects, and helped to establish the statewide California Mathematics Project, which she coordinated during its first two years.

As a co-founder of the College Preparatory Mathematics Program (CPM) she has co-authored four textbooks and contributed to three others, which are used nationwide at the middle and high school levels.  She continues to serves as a Director and Board Member for the non-profit organization, CPM Educational Program, which provides professional development for teachers across the US. 

 

EDUCATION:          

  • University of California, Davis        1999    Ph.D. Mathematics Education
  • University of California, Berkeley   1966    M.A.   Mathematics
  • University of California, Berkeley   1962    A.B.   Mathematics

 

CREDENTIALS:

  • California Teaching Credential-General Secondary Life Diploma, 1971.
  • California Administrative Services Credential, 1976-1981.

 

PUBLICATIONS:

Current Text Books

  • Kysh, J, Sallee, T., Dietiker, L., Hoey, B. (2013).  Core Connections Algebra 2.  Sacramento, CA.  CPM Educational Program.
  • Johnson, K., Herr, T., Kysh, J. (2012). Crossing the River with Dogs: Problem Solving for College Students (New edition).Hoboken, NJ , John Wiley & Sons.
  • Dietiker, L., Kysh, J., Sallee, T., Hoey, B. (2010). Making Connections: Foundations for Algebra, Course 1. Sacramento, CA. CPM Educational Program.
  • Dietiker, L., Kysh, J., Sallee, T., Hoey, B. (2010). Making Connections: Foundations for Algebra, Course 2. Sacramento, CA. CPM Educational Program.
  • Kysh, J, Sallee, T., Dietiker, L., Hoey, B. (2009).  Algebra 2 Connections.  Sacramento, CA.  CPM Educational Program.

 

Recent Journal Articles

  • Hsu, E., Kysh, J., Resek, D., & Ramage, K. (2012).  Changing Teachers’ Conception of Mathematics.  NCSM Journal of Mathematics Education Leadership, 14 (1).
  • Hsu, E., Kysh, J., Ramage, K., & Resek, D. (2009). Helping Teachers Un-structure: A Promising Approach. The Montana Math Enthusiast, 6 (3).
  • Hsu, E., Iwasaki, K., Kysh, J., Ramage, K., and Resek, D. (2009). Three REAL Lessons About Mentoring.  In G. Zimmermann, L. Fulmore, P. Guinee and E. Murray (Eds.), Empowering Mentors of Experienced Mathematics Teachers. Reston, VA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.
  • Hsu, E., Kysh, J., Resek, D. (2007). “Seeking Big Ideas in Algebra: the Evolution of a Task.”  Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education. 10 (4-6) 325-332.
  • Hsu, E., Kysh, J., Resek, D. (2007).  “Differentiated Instruction Through Rich Problems.”  New England Mathematics Journal. 39, 6-13.
  • Coffey, M., Kysh,J., Thompson, A. (Eds.) (2007) Mathematics Teacher 100th Anniversary Issue.  January 2007.  NCTM, Reston VA.
  • Kamii, C., & Kysh, J. (2006). The difficulty of "length x width": Is a square the unit of measurement? Journal of Mathematical Behavior, 25, 105-115.

 

GRANTS (since 2000):

  • 2008-2009           Center for Science and Mathematics Education, San Francisco State, Teacher Research in Mathematics and Science for K-12 Teachers.
  • 2005-2008           California Math Science Partnership with San Rafael City Schools, San Francisco State and Sonoma State Universities.
  • 2003-2010           REAL, Revitalizing Algebra, National Science Foundation.
  • 2001-2004           San Mateo County Algebra Institute. California Mathematics, Project, University of California Office of the President.
  • 2000-2002           Publishing Teacher Research, Spencer Foundation.
Picture of Maika Watanabe
Position:
Department Chair
Phone
415-338-1622
Biography:

Originally from Los Angeles and educated in the Los Angeles Unified School District, Maika Watanabe is a Professor in the Department of Secondary Education at San Francisco State University. 

 

Maika teaches Teaching for Equity in Secondary Schools in the single-subject teacher credential program.  The essential questions of the course include:

1) How do social class, gender, race, and sexual orientation influence the schooling experiences of our students?

2) How do school-based factors contribute to inequitable schooling outcomes for students? 

3) How might we as teachers utilize our understanding of inequity to act as change agents in our school communities?  She models various pedagogical techniques during her seminar that teachers can use in their classrooms to make instruction more student-centered and to encourage equitable student participation. 

 

In addition to this seminar, Maika enjoys supervising student teachers in middle and high schools around the Bay Area, providing feedback on areas of strength and areas to grow.   Maika also teaches a research seminar for students working towards their MA in Secondary Education. 

 

Before arriving at SF State in 2003, she earned her teaching credential and taught middle school social studies and high school history in California and North Carolina.  She also taught education courses for undergraduate students at UC Berkeley, and supervised student teachers at Mills College. 

 

Maika has conducted research on tracking and detracking, high-stakes accountability policies, a teacher inquiry group, and Complex Instruction in math and science classrooms.  She is excited about a new project where she hopes to provide support to teachers as they transition to the demands of the new Common Core curricula in heterogeneous math classrooms.

 

She is a member of the American Educational Researchers Association, and founded its Special Interest Group (SIG), Tracking and Detracking.  Maika is also a member of the National Association for Multicultural Education, and Parents for Public Schools.

 

Education

  • Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley
  • M.A. University of California, Berkeley
  • B.A. Swarthmore College
  • Teaching Credential  Swarthmore College

 

Recent Publications

  • Watanabe, M. and Evans, L. (2015).  Assessments that promote collaborative learning.  Mathematics Teacher,109 (4), 298 – 304.
  • Watanabe, M. (2012).  Tracking in U.S. Schools.  In J.A. Banks, Ed. Encyclopedia of Diversity in Education.  Thousand  Oaks:  SAGE Publications.
  • Watanabe, M. (2012).  "Heterogenius" Classrooms:  Detracking Math and Science.  A Look at Groupwork in Action.  New York: Teachers College Press.
  • Watanabe, M. (2009). Ability grouping. In R.A. Schweder, Ed. The Chicago Companion to the Child. University of Chicago Press.
  • Watanabe, M. (2008). High-Stakes Accountability for Equity? A Study of Classroom Instruction across Tracks in North Carolina. Teachers College Record, 110(3), 489 – 534.
  • Watanabe, M., N. Nunes, S. Mebane, K. Scalise & J. Claesgens (2007). "Chemistry for all, instead of chemistry just for the elite:" Lessons learned from detracked chemistry classrooms. Science Education, 91(5), 683 – 709.
  • Watanabe, M. (2007). Lessons from a teacher inquiry group about tracking: Perceived student choice in course-taking and its implications for detracking reform. Teachers College Record, 109(9), 2136 – 2170.
  • Watanabe, M. (2007). Displaced Teacher and State Priorities in a High-Stakes Accountability Context. Educational Policy, 21(2),311–368.
  • Watanabe, M. (2007). Tracking. In S. Mathison and E.W. Ross, Eds. Battleground Schools (pp.671–679). Westport, CT: Greenwood/Praeger.
  • Watanabe, M. (2006). "Some people think this school is tracked and some people don't": Using inquiry groups to unpack teachers' perspectives on detracking. Theory into Practice. 45(1), 24–31.

 

External Research Grants

  • Spencer Foundation Small Grant (2007-2008)

Special Education & Communicative Disorders (SPED & CD)

Yvonne Bui
Position:
Department Chair
Phone
(415) 338-2503
Biography:
Laura Epstein
Position:
Associate Professor
Phone
415-338-1058
Biography:

Laura Epstein, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, Associate Professor and Coordinator, Program in Communicative Disorders; school internship coordinator, Department of Special Education & Communicative Disorders.  Research interests include Spanish-bilingual language development, classroom-based intervention, and school-based issues.  Received the California Speech-Language-Hearing Association Diversity Award in 2011, and the California Healthcare Foundation Leadership Fellowship in 2010. 


Educational Background

  • 1994 University of California, Santa Barbara, Ph.D., Speech and Hearing Sciences. 
  • 1990 University of California, Santa Barbara, M.A., Speech and Hearing Sciences.
  • 1988 San Jose State University, curriculum in Communication Disorders & Sciences.
  • 1983 University of London, Institute of Archaeology, M.S., Bioarchaeology.
  • 1982 University of California, Berkeley, B.A., Anthropology.

Certification and Licenses

  • Certificate of Clinical Competence in Speech-Language Pathology, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 1991-present
  • California State License in Speech and Language Pathology, Speech Language and Audiology Licensing Board, 1991-present

Recent Publications

  • Epstein, L. (2012). Dimensions of building clinical training teams in the Spanish-bilingual preschool classroom. Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, 22, 28-32. 
  • Yu, B. and Epstein, L. (2011). Facilitating Critical Reflections About Disability Among Students in Speech-Language Pathology. Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education (ASHA Division 10), 14 (1), 11-20. 
  • Epstein, L., Nazario, A., & Yu, B. (2009). Evaluation of evidence in evidence-based practice and how library science can help. Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education (ASHA Division 10), 12(1), 32-41. 
  • Epstein, L. and Pena, E. (2008). Co-Editors, Topics in Language Disorders, 28(3). 
  • Epstein, L. and Pena, E. (2008). Issue Editor Foreword. Topics in Language Disorders, 28(3). 
  • Epstein, L. (2008). Clinical therapy data as learning process: The first year of clinical training and beyond. Topics in Language Disorders, 28(3), 274–285. 
  • Robinson, N. A., Graham, M. S., Epstein, L., Graham, B. J. (2008, April 15). Strategic planning in CSD program: The San Francisco State example. The ASHA Leader, 13(5), 28-30. 
  • Epstein, L. (2007). The art and science of clinical data collection. CSHA magazine, Summer 2007, 12 – 13. 
  • Chambers, T., and Epstein, L. (2007). The art and science of clinical interaction. CSHA Magazine, Summer 2007, 3-4.
  • Epstein, L., and Chambers, T. (2007). Co-Editors, CSHA Magazine, Summer 2007.

 

SFSU Logo
Position:
Assistant Professor
Phone
415-338-7654
Biography:

Dr. Amber Friesen is an assistant professor is early childhood special education in the Department of Special Education and Communicative Disorders. Her primary teaching responsibilities include courses in family systems and services, and early intervention. Dr. Friesen’s primary research interests focus on supporting young children at-risk or diagnosed with disabilities and their families. Specifically she is interested in promoting inclusive early childhood settings and strong family partnerships.

Educational Background

  • Ph.D. Indiana University, 2011
  • M.Ed. Indiana University, 2008
  • B.Ed/B.A. University of Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada, 2003

 

Recent Publications

  • Friesen, A., Stewart-Henry, K., & Webb, D. (accepted). Supporting powerful interactions within families that promote early language and literacy development. Advances in Early Education and Day Care.

  • Friesen, A., &, Hsia, S. (accepted). Early intervention. In E.L. Meyen & Y.N. Bui, Exceptional children in today’s schools. What teachers need to know (6th ed.).

  • Mihai, A., Butera, G., & Friesen. A. (accepted). Examining the use of curriculum to support early literacy instruction: A multiple case study of Head Start teachers. Early Education and Development.

  • Horn, E., Kang, J., Classen, A., Butera, G. , Palmer, S., Lieber, J., Friesen, A., & Mihai, A. (2016). Role of universal design for learning and differentiation in inclusive preschools. In L Meyers & T. Catalino (Eds).  DEC recommended practices: Environment practices (DEC Recommended Practices Monograph Series No. 2)(pp. 51-66). Los Angeles, CA: Author.

  • Vaiouli, P., & Friesen, A. (2016). The magic of music: Using songs to engage young children with ASD in early literacy activities. Childhood Education, 92(2), 126-133.

  • Butera, G., Friesen, A., Horn, E., Palmer, S., Vaiouli, P. (2016). Adults working and playing well together. In E. Horn, S. Palmer, G. Butera, & J. Lieber (Eds.), Children’s School Success: A framework for inclusive early education (pp. 183-198). Baltimore, MD: Paul. H. Brookes Publishing Co.

  • Lieber, J., Friesen, A., Mihai, A., & Vaiouli, P. (2016). Foundations of challenging curriculum content. In E. Horn, S. Palmer, G. Butera, & J. Lieber (Eds.), Children’s School Success: A framework for inclusive early education (pp. 23-50). Baltimore, MD: Paul. H. Brookes Publishing Co.

  • Butera, G., Friesen, A., Mihai, A., & Vaiouli, P. (2016). Connecting with families to support children’s school success. In E. Horn, S. Palmer, G. Butera, & J. Lieber (Eds.), Children’s School Success: A framework for inclusive early education (pp. 199-214). Baltimore, MD: Paul. H. Brookes Publishing Co.

  • Palmer, S., Butera, G., Friesen, A., & Clay, J. (2016). Components of progress monitoring. In E. Horn, S. Palmer, G. Butera, & J. Lieber (Eds.), Children’s School Success: A framework for inclusive early education (pp. 111-135). Baltimore, MD: Paul. H. Brookes Publishing Co.

  • Butera, G., Horn, E., Palmer, S., Friesen, A., & Lieber, J. (2016). Understanding science technology engineering arts and mathematics (STEAM) within early childhood special education. In B. Reichow, B.A. Boyd, E. E. Barton, & S. Odon. (Eds.). Handbook of early childhood special education (pp. 143-162). New York, NY: Springer.

  • Friesen, A., Hanson, M., & Martin, K. (2015). In the eye of the beholder: Cultural Considerations in interpreting children’s behaviors. Young Exceptional Children, 18(4), 19-30.

  • Mihai, A., Friesen, A., Butera, G., Horn, E., Palmer, S., & Lieber, J. (2015). Teaching phonological awareness to all children through storybook reading. Young Exceptional Children, 18(4), 3-18.

  • Friesen, A. & Butera, G. (2015). Examining early literacy beliefs and practices within a Head Start program” Building bridges. NHSA Dialog, 18(1), 43-60.

  • Friesen, A. & Butera, G. (2015). Building meaningful partnerships with families to promote early literacy development: Implications for practitioners. NHSA Dialog, 18(1), 101-105.

  • Friesen, A., Butera, G., Kang, J., Horn, E., Lieber, J., & Palmer, S. (2014). Collaboration in preschool to promote early literacy for children: Lessons learned from the CSS curriculum. Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation, 24(2), 149-164.

  • Weiss, S., & Friesen, A. (2014). Capitalizing on curriculum-based measurements for readings: Collaboration within a response to intervention/instruction framework. Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation, 24(2), 96-109.

  • Butera, G., Friesen, A., Palmer, S., Lieber, J., Horn, E., Hanson, M., & Czaja, C. (2014). I can figure this out!: Integrating math problem solving and critical thinking in early education curriculum. Young Children, 69 (3), 70-77.

  • Butera, G., Friesen, A., & Stone-McDonald, A. (2013). What you can accomplish in a year: Head Start teachers’ instructional decision-making. Head Start Dialog. 16(4), 11-29.

  • Butera, G. Friesen, A., & Stone-McDonald, A. (2013). Helping Head Start teachers support children’s school readiness: Lessons learned. Head Start Dialog, 16(4), 94-98.

  • Friesen, A., & Butera, G. (2012). “You introduce all of the alphabet but I do not think it should be the main focus”: Exploring early educators’ decision about reading instruction. Early Childhood Education Journal, 20, 361-368.

     

Recent Grants/ Awards

Principal Investigator (2014-2018)

Careers and Inclusive Resources related to Children’s Learning in the

Early Years (CIRCLE). U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special

Education Programs

 

Awardee (2016/17, 2015/16)

San Francisco State University Instructionally Related Activities (IRA).

Early Childhood Special Education Conference

 

Awardee (2016)

Course Development for Undergraduate Degree

PATH program, Child and Adolescent Department

 

Awardee (2016)

Graduate College of Education Travel Award to explore Student Summer - Program in Cape Town, South Africa.

 

Principal Investigator (2013/14)

Investigating a Family Workshop Series’ Contributions to Children’s

School Readiness and Family Involvement Within Jumpstart. Jumpstart

 

Coordinator of Field Research/ Adjunct Researcher (2010/14)

Children’s School Success Plus (CSS+). Institute of Education Sciences.

Principal Investigator: Eva Horn, Co-Directors: Susan Palmer, Joan Lieber,

and Gretchen Butera

 

 

 

Teresa Gray
Position:
Assistant Professor
Phone
415-405-3488
Biography:

Dr. Teresa Gray is an Assistant Professor in the Communicative Disorders Program.  Her expertise is in the areas of aphasia, traumatic brain injury, and bilingualism. She supervises on- and off-campus adult neurogenic clinics and teaches the graduate level seminars on adult language disorders. She is the director of the Gray Matter Lab. Her research interests focus on bilingual aphasia and language access, the mechanisms of control in linguistic and non-linguistic contexts in aphasia, and the role of language rehabilitation and its short-term and long-term effects on functional communication.

For more information on Dr. Gray's research, visit her lab website: Gray Matter Lab.

 

Educational Background

  • Ph.D., Boston University (2015)
  • M.A., San Jose State University (2008)
  • B.A., University of California at Santa Cruz (2000)

 

Certification and Licences

  • Certificate of Clinical Competence in Speech-Language Pathology, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (2008-present)
  • California State License in Speech and Language Pathology, Speech Language and Audiology Licensing Board (2008-present)

 

Publications (selected)

  • Gray, T., & Kiran, S. (2015).  The relationship between language control and cognitive control in bilingual aphasia. Bilingualism: Language and Cognition, 1-20.
  • Kiran, S., Sandberg, C., Gray, T., Ascenso, E., & Kester, E. (2013). Rehabilitation in bilingual aphasia: Evidence for within-and between-language generalization. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology22(2), S298.
  • Gray, T. & Kiran, S. (2013). A theoretical account of lexical and semantic deficits in bilingual aphasia. Journal of Speech Language and Hearing Research, 56, 1314-1327.

 

Presentations (selected)

  • Gray, T., DesRoches, C., & Kiran, S. (2016, May).  Poster presented at the 46th Annual Clinical Aphasiology Conference, Charlottesville, VA.  Title: Non-linguistic cognitive control in monolingual vs. bilingual aphasia.
  • Gray, T., & Kiran, S. (2015, September).  Paper Session at the International Symposium on Monolingual and Bilingual Speech, Crete, Greece.  Title: Mechanisms of language control and cognitive control in bilingual aphasia.
  • Gray, T. & Kiran, S. (2015, March).  Poster presented at the 22nd Annual Cognitive Neuroscience Society Meeting, San Francisco, CA. Title: Control mechanisms in bilingual aphasia.
  • Gray, T. & Kiran, S. (2014, November).  Paper presented at the American Speech-Language- Hearing Association, Orlando, FL.  Title: Application of current theoretical models to bilingual aphasia rehabilitation. 
  • Gray, T. & Kiran, S. (2013, November). Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Chicago, IL. Title: Cognitive control in bilingual aphasia.
  • Gray, T., Glynn, P., Luk, G., & Kiran, S. (2013, March).  Poster presented at the 20th Annual Cognitive Neuroscience Society Meeting, San Francisco, CA. Title: Gray matter volume differences between Spanish-English and Hindi-English bilinguals.
  • Gray, T. & Kiran, S. (2012, November). Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Atlanta, GA.Title: Bilingual aphasia: What is the role of proficiency and impairment?
  • Kiran S., Sandberg, C., Kester, E., Ascenso, E., Gray, T., & Roberts, P. (2012, May).  Paper presented at the 42nd Annual Clinical Aphasiology Conference, Lake Tahoe, CA.  Title: Rehabilitation of bilingual aphasia: Evidence for within and between language generalization.
  • Gray, T. & Kiran, S. (2012, March). Poster presented at the 19th Annual Cognitive Neuroscience Society Meeting, Chicago, Il.  Title: A theoretical account of bilingual aphasia.
Image of Marci Hanson
Position:
Professor
Phone
415-338-6353
Biography:

Dr. Marci Hanson is the Director of the Joint Doctoral Program in Special Education with University of California Berkeley (SFSU campus) and Professor of Early Childhood Special Education in the Department of Special Education. Her primary teaching responsibilities have included graduate courses in family systems and services, atypical infant development, atypical learning and development, and infant and preschool intervention.

 

Research Interests

Primary research interests and grant activities have centered on inclusion in early childhood education, early social-emotional development, policy in early education, and early intervention for young children who are at risk and/or disabled. Dr. Hanson has published widely in the areas of early intervention, atypical infant development, family services, cross-cultural training, and personnel preparation.

 

Educational Background

  • Ph.D. University of Oregon
  • M.S. The Pennsylvania State University
  • B.S., University Of Oregon

 

Grants (Selected)

  • Careers and Inclusive Resources related to Children’s Learning in the Early years (CIRCLE) (Co-Director Amber Friesen). U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs. 2014-2018.
  • Joint Doctoral Special Education Leadership Preparation (SELP). U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs. 2006-2012
  • Preparing Early Educators for Careers in Special Education (PEECS). U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs. 2006-2010
  • Children’s School Success Project. National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NIH). Subcontract from Indiana University. 2002-2010
  • Early Childhood Research Institute on Inclusion, U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs. 1994-2000

 

Publications (Selected Refereed)

  • Friesen, A., Hanson, M.J., & Martin, K. (2014). In the eyes of the beholder: Cultural considerations in interpreting children’s behaviors. Young Exceptional Children. 
  • Butera G., Friesen, A., Palmer, S., Lieber, J., Horn, E., Hanson, M., & Czaja, C. (2014). Integrating mathematics problem solving and critical thinking into the curriculum. Young Children, 69, 70-77.
  • Hanson, M. J., Miller, A., Diamond, K., Odom, S., Lieber, J., Butera, G. et al. (2011). Neighborhood community risk influences on preschool children’s development and school readiness. Infants and Young Children, 24, 1-14.
  • Lieber, J., Hanson, M., Butera, G., Palmer, S., Horn, E., & Czaja, C. (2010). Do preschool teachers sustain their use of a new curriculum? (Research to Practice). NHSA (National Head Start Association) Dialog, 13 (4), 248-252.
  • Lieber, J., Butera, G., Hanson, M., Palmer, S., Horn, E. & Czaja, C. (2010). Sustainability of a preschool curriculum: What encourages continued use among teachers? NHSA (National Head Start Association) Dialog, 13 (4), 225-242.
  • Odom, S., Fleming, K., Diamond, K., Lieber, J., Hanson, M., Butera, G., Horn, E., Palmer, S., and Marquis, J. (2010). Examining different forms of implementation in early childhood curriculum research. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 25, 314-328.
  • Lieber, J., Butera, G., Hanson, M., et al., (2009). Factors that influence the implementation of a new preschool curriculum: Implications for professional development. Early Education and Development, 20, 456-481.
  • Odom, S. L., Vitztum, J., Wolery, R., Lieber, J., Sandall, S., Hanson, M. J., Beckman, P., Schwartz, I., & Horn, E. (2004). Preschool inclusion in the United States: A review of research from an ecological systems perspective. Journal of Research in Special Educational Needs, 4 (1), 17-49.
  • Hanson, M. J. (2003). Twenty-five years after early intervention: A follow-up study of children with Down syndrome and their families. Infants and Young Children, 16,354-365.
  • Soodak, L. Erwin, E., Winton, P. Brotherson, M.J., Turnbull, A., Hanson, M. J., & Brault, L., (2002). Implementing inclusive early childhood education: A call for professional empowerment. Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, 22, 91-102.
  • Hanson, M.J., Horn, E., Sandall, S., Beckman, P., Morgan, M., Marquart, J., Barnwell, D., & Chou, H.Y. (2001). After preschool inclusion: Children’s educational pathways over the early school years. Exceptional Children, 68, 65-83. 
  • Hanson, M.J., & Bruder, M.E. (2001). Early intervention: Promises to keep. Infants and Young Children, 13 (3), 47-58.
  • Odom, S., Hanson, M.J., Lieber, J., Marquart, J., Sandall, S., Wolery, R., Horn, E., Schwartz, I., Beckman, P., Hikido, C., & Chambers, J. (2001). The costs of preschool inclusion. Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, 21, (46-55). 
  • Hanson, M. J., Beckman, P. J., Horn, E., Marquart, J., Sandall, S., Greig, D, & Brennan, E. (2000). Entering preschool: Family and professional experiences in this transition process. Journal of Early Intervention, 23, 279-293.
  • Lieber, J., Hanson, M. J., Beckman, P. J., Odom, S. L., Sandall, S., Schwartz, I., Horn, E., & Wolery, R.(2000). Key influences on the initiation and implementation of inclusive preschool programs. Exceptional Children, 67 (1), 83-98.

 

Books (Selected)

  • Hanson, M. J. & Lynch, E. W. (2013). Understanding families: Supportive approaches to diversity, disability, and risk (2nd ed.) Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.
  • VandenBerg, K.A., & Hanson, M.J. (2013). Coming home from the NICU: A Guide for supporting families in early infant care and development. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.
  • Lynch, E. W. & Hanson, M. J. (Eds.) (2011). Developing cross-cultural competence: Working with young children and their families (4th ed.). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.
  • Hanson, M. J. & Lynch, E. W. (2004). Understanding families: Approaches to diversity, disability, and risk. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co. ed.). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.
  • Lynch, E. W. & Hanson, M. J. (Eds.) (2004). Developing cross-cultural competence: Working with young children and their families (3rd ed.). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.
  • Odom, S., Hanson, M. J., Blackman, J., & Kaul, S. (Eds.) (2003). Early intervention: Practices around the world. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.
  • Hanson, M. J., & Beckman, P. (2001). Me Too! Book series including: Introducing Me; It’s time for preschool; My community, my family; My new friends; On my best behavior; and Look what I can donow. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.

 

Chapters (Selected)

  • Hanson M.J. & Lynch, E.W. (2014). Family diversity, assessment, and cultural competence. In M. McLean, M. L. Hemmeter, & P. A. Snyder (Eds.). Essential elements for assessing infants and preschoolers with special needs (pp. 123-158). Boston: Pearson Education, Inc.
  • Odom, S., Hanson, M., Lieber, J., Diamond, K., Palmer, S., Butera, G., & Horn, E. (2010). Prevention, early childhood intervention, and implementation science. In B. Doll, W. Pfohl, & J. Yoon (Eds.), Handbook of youth prevention science (pp. 413-432). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
  • Hanson, M. J. & Lynch, E.W. (2010). Working with families from diverse backgrounds. In R. McWilliam (Eds.), Working with families of young children with special needs (pp. 147-174). New York: Guilford Press. 
  • Hanson, M.J., & SooHoo, T. (2008). Cultural and linguistic influences on young children’s social competence. In W. Brown, S. Odom, & S. McConnell (Eds.), Social competence of young children: Risk, disability, and evidence-based practices (2nd ed.) (pp. 61-76). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.
  • Hanson, M.J. (2005). Ensuring effective transitions in early intervention. In M. Guralnick (Ed.), The developmental systems approach to early intervention (pp. 373-398). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.
  • Hanson, M. J. (2005). Disability in childhood: Views within the context of society. In H. Goelman, S. Marshall, & S. Ross (Eds.). Multiple lenses, multiple images: Perspectives on the child across time, space, and disciplines (109-121). University of Toronto Press. 
  • Lynch, E.W. & Hanson M.J. (2004). Family diversity, assessment, and cultural competence. In M. McLean, M. Wolery, & D.B. Bailey (Eds.). Assessing infants and preschoolers with special needs (3rd ed.). Columbus, OH: Pearson Education, Inc.
  • Hanson, M. J. (2003). National legislation for early intervention in the United States. In S. Odom, M. Hanson, J. Blackman, & S. Kaul (Eds.). Early intervention: Practices around the world. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.
  • Hanson, M.J. (2002). Cultural and linguistic diversity: Influences on preschool inclusion. ; Beckman, P., Hanson, M. J., & Horn, E. (2002). Family perceptions of inclusion. ; Beckman, P., & Hanson, M.J. (2002). Community participation of children with disabilities. ; Lieber, J., Wolery, R., Horn, E., Tschantz, J., Beckman, P., & Hanson, M.J. (2002). Collaborative relationships among adults in inclusive preschool programs. In S. L. Odom (Ed.), Widening the circle: Including children with disabilities in preschool programs. New York: Teachers College Press.
  • Hanson, M.J., & Zercher, C. (2001). The impact of cultural and linguistic diversity in inclusive preschool settings. In. M. J. Guralnick (Ed.), Early childhood inclusion: Focus on change. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.

 

Summer Hsia
Position:
Associate Professor
Phone
415-338-2502
Biography:

Educational Background

  • B.A. Soochow University (1978)
  • M.A. Indiana University (1982)
  • Ph.D. University of Oregon (1993)
  • Dr. Summer Tsai-hsing Hsia is an Associate Professor and coordinates the Early Childhood Special Education credential and master’s degree programs in the Department of Special Education.  Her primary responsibilities include teaching courses in the area of early childhood special education,supervising student teachers, chairing the master’s degree students’ projects, and mentoring students in the Joint Doctoral Program.

 

Research Interests and Current Funded Project

Dr. Hsia’s research interests focus on curriculum-based assessments, activity-based intervention, and issues in cultural diversity and families.  She has developed international interaction and collaboration with a number of universities in Taiwan, which has provided formal opportunities to cooperate in the areas of education and research through a program of academic and cultural exchange.

In collaboration with Dr. Amanda Lueck in the Visually Impaired Program, Dr. Hsia was awarded a personnel preparation grant from the Department of Education (OSEP) in 2009 to prepare professionals to work with young children, birth to 5, with visual impairments and their families.

 

Selected Publications

  • Hsia, T. H., Wu, Y. (submitted for review) Transitioning from kindergarten to first grade: Experiences of young children with special needs.  
  • Hsia, T. H. (submitted for review) Providing culturally responsive early intervention services to multicultural families.
  • Hsia, T. H. (submitted for review) Issues in delivering family-guided early intervention services to culturallv diverse families.
  • Hsia, T. H., McCabe, H., & Li, B.J. (2003) People’s Republic of China: Cultural issues and service provision in rural area.  In S. L. Odom, M. J. Hanson, J. A. Blackman, & S. Kaul (Eds.).  Early intervention: Practices from around the world.  Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co, 27-47.
  • Karres, D., & Hsia, T. H. (2003).  Shi young ri ji dui haw lai jiao dao long he ting zhang xue sheng (Dialogue journal writing with learners who are deaf and hard of hearing:  Implications for teacher education).  Zhong Guo Te Shu Jiao Yu (Special Education in China), Spring 2003.

 

Biography for Pam Hunt
Position:
Professor
Phone
415-338-7848
Biography:

Educational Background

Pam Hunt is a professor in the Department of Special Education and coordinator of the Moderate/Severe Disabilities Program Area. She completed a BA degree from the University of California, Berkeley in psychology, a teaching credential and MA degree from San Francisco State University under the mentorship of Dr. Wayne Sailor, and a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley, through the Joint Doctoral Program in Special Education (UC, Berkeley, and San Francisco State University).

 

Research Interests

Dr. Hunt's research interests include communication and social competence for students who experience significant disabilities; inclusive education and the development of social supports for students with intensive support needs who are members of general education classrooms; and collaborative teaming and school restructuring to create school communities in which all students are valued and fully participating members. Dr. Hunt has a demonstrated publication record of research in each of these areas and has presented her research studies at numerous national and state educational conferences.

Dr. Hunt has been directly involved in 12 federal grants and contracts from the US. Department of Education in the role of principal investigator, co-principal investigator, or director--procuring a total of $14,300,000 in external grant funding: $5,150,000 in research grants, $3,400,000 in personnel preparation grants (which supports students’ tuition), and $5,750,000 in technical assistance and training grants. Currently she is the principal investigator for three federal grants totaling $6,625,000. Her most recent $2,750,000 research grant was funded in 2015 by the U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences. The results of the study that she, with Dr. Elizabeth Kozleski at the University of Kansas, will conduct will provide guidance to educators on effective models for implementing systematic reading instruction to students with significant disabilities in general education classroom settings with general education peers participating in the lessons as “reading buddies.”

In 2016, Dr. Hunt received the Distinguished Faculty Award for Excellence in Professional Achievement from San Francisco State University.

 

Recent Publications

McDonnell, J., Hunt, P., & Jameson, M. (2015). Achieving equity and belonging: From segregated to inclusive education. In M. Agran, F. Spooner, & K. Gee (Eds.), TASH 40th Anniversary.

McDonnell, J., Hunt, P., Ryndak, D., & Jackson, L. (2014). Educational standards for students with significant intellectual disabilities: A response to Lou Brown. TASH Connections, 38(4), 30-35. Invited response.

McDonnell, J., & Hunt, P. (2013). Inclusive education and meaningful school outcomes (pp. 155-176). In M Agran, F. Brown, C. Hughes, C. Quirk, & D. Ryndak (Eds.), Equity and full participation for individuals with severe disabilities. Baltimore: Paul H. Brooks.

Hunt, P., McDonnell, J., & Crockett, M. (2012). Reconciling an ecological curricular framework focusing on quality of life outcomes with the development and instruction of standards-based academic goals. Research and Practice for Persons With Severe Disabilities, 37(3), 139-152.

Mortier, K., Hunt, P., Leroy, M., De Schauwer, E., & Van Hove, G (2010). Communities of practice in   inclusive education. Educational Studies, 36(3), 345-355. The most downloaded article published in Educational Studies in 2010 and, therefore, included in the Routledge Education Class of 2011.

Mortier, K., Hunt, P., Desimpel, L., Van Hove, G. (2009). With parents at the table: Creating supports for children with disabilities in general education classrooms. European Journal of Special Needs Education, 24(4). 337-354.

Hunt, P., Doering, K., Maier, J., & Mintz, E. (2009). Strategies to support the development of positive social relationships and friendships for students who use AAC (pp. 247-264). In G. Soto & C. Zangari (Eds.), Practically speaking: Language, literacy, & academic development for students with AAC needs. Baltimore: Paul Brookes.

 

Maryssa Kucskar
Position:
Assistant Professor
Phone
415-338-3430
Biography:
Janelle Lawson Biography
Position:
Assistant Professor
Phone
415-338-3428
Biography:

Janelle Lawson, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of special education in the Department of Special Education and Communicative Disorders, and co-coordinator of the mild/moderate disabilities program. Her primary teaching responsibilities include courses related to understanding, assessing, and instructing individuals with mild/moderate disabilities. Dr. Lawson’s primary research interests include supporting equitable measures of special education teacher efficacy, investigating pedagogical practices and instructional delivery designs for improved teacher preparation, and increasing the strategic recruitment and retention of special education teachers.

Educational Background

  • Ph.D., Special Education, University of California, Los Angeles, and California State University, Los Angeles, Joint Doctoral Program, 2015
  • M.A., Special Education, California State University, Los Angeles, 2011
  • B.A., Sociology, University of California, Los Angeles, 2006 

Publications

Lawson, J. E., & Knollman, G. A. (in press).  Evaluating special education teachers: School administrators’ perceptions of the process. The Journal of Special Education Leadership.

 

Lawson, J. E., & Cmar, J. L. (2016). Implications of state policy changes on mental health service models for students with disabilities. The Journal of Special Education Apprenticeship, 5(1), 1-15.

 

Lawson, J. E. (2014). Value-added modeling: Challenges for measuring special education teacher quality. InterActions: UCLA Journal of Education and Information Studies, 10(1), gseis_interactions_20131. Retrieved from http://escholarship.org/uc/item/9r67085n

 

Lawson, J. E. (2013). A look at California Assembly Bill 114: Transition of special education and related services formerly provided by county mental health agencies. Retrieved from http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu/pdfdocs/ass114brief.pdf

 

 

Recent Grants/Awards

Principal Investigator (2016)

Study title: An Inquiry into School Administrators’ Training and Support Needs for Evaluating Special Educators. Office of Research and Sponsored Programs, San Francisco State University.

 

Community Engaged Scholarship Faculty Mini-Grant (2016)                                        

Funding to support incorporating a Community Service Learning (CSL) component as an option in an Introduction to Disabilities course.  San Francisco State University.

 

Principal Investigator (2016)                                                                                                    

Study title: An Analysis of School Administrator Rater Reliability at the Rubric Item Level. San Francisco State University.

 

Picture of SF State Logo
Position:
Assistant Professor
Phone
415-338-7847
Biography:

Kathleen is an assistant professor in the Moderate/Severe Disabilities program in the Department of Special Education.  Before joining the faculty at SFSU, she worked in Central Amercia and in Belgium on inclusion practice for students with moderate to severe disabilities. Her work included coordinating a community based rehabilitation project, advocating with the parents for inclusive placements in general education schools, coaching the school teams in using a ecological approach when designing curricula and supports for students with significant disabilities, training professionals and later students in Ghent University, conducting research, and participating in policy efforts on systems change towards more inclusive education.  She teaches courses on communication and instructional strategies for students with moderate to severe disabilities.

Her research interests include inclusive education and the development of supports for students with intensive support needs who are part of the general education classroom; empowerment of parents and students through communities of practice and innovations and systems change moving in contexts of substantial fear and resistance toward inclusion.

Educational Background

  • Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium
    Ph.D. Pedagogical Science, October 2010
     
  • San Francisco State University, San Francisco, California
    M.A. Special Education, May 1998
     
  • Sint-Andreas Institute, Bruges, Belgium
    B.A. Pedagogical Science, June 1991

Publications

Journal articles

  • Mortier, K., & Ranschaert, I. (2015). Inclusieve waarden en normen in ons onderwijs: waarom en hoe? [Inclusive norms and values in education: why and how?]. School- en klaspraktijk, 23(1), 2-12.
  • Mortier, K., Hunt, P., Desimpel, L., & Van Hove, G. (2012). Participatie van kinderen met een beperking en hun ouders in de realisatie van inclusief onderwijs [The participation of children with disabilities and thier parents in the realization of inclusive education]. Tijdschrift voor Orthopedagogiek, 51(4), 319-330.
  • Mortier, K., Desimpel, L., De Schauwer, E., & Van Hove, G. (2011). ‘I want support, not comments,’ children’s perspectives on supports in their life. Disability and Society, 26(2), 207-221.
  • Mortier, K., Hunt, P., Leroy, M., Van de Putte I., & Van Hove, G. (2010). Communities of practice in inclusive education. Educational Studies, 36(3), 345-355.
  • Mortier, K., Van Hove, G., & De Schauwer, E. (2010). Supports for children with disabilities in regular education classrooms: an account of different perspectives in Flanders. International Journal of Inclusive Education, 14(6), 543-561.
  • Mortier, K., Hunt, P., Desimpel, L., & Van Hove. (2009). With parents at the table: creating supports for children with disabilities in general education classrooms. The European Journal of Special Needs Education, 24(4), 337-354.
  • Mortier, K., Van Hove, G., De Schauwer, E., Van de Putte, I., & Loots, G. (2008). “Het is gewoon een kind”- Onderzoek over inclusief onderwijs, ervaring van leerkrachten [“It's just a kid” - Research on inclusive education, teachers' experiences]. Signaal, 64(4): 4-21.

Books

  • Mortier, K. (2010). Creating supports for children with disabilities in general education classrooms, from an expert model to a partnership model. Gent: Orthopedagogische Reeks.
  • Mortier, K. De Schauwer, E., Van de Putte, I., & Van Hove, G. (2010). Inclusief onderwijs in de praktijk [Inclusive education in practice]. Antwerpen: Garant.
  • Mortier, K., De Schauwer, E, & Van Hove, G. (2005). Het onderzoek inclusief onderwijs [The inclusive education study]. Gent: Orthopedagogische Reeks.
  • Devroey, A. & Mortier, K. (2002). Polyfonie in de klas. Een praktijkboek voor inclusie [Polyphony in the class: a manual for inclusion]. Leuven: Acco.
Philip Prinz Biography
Position:
Professor
Email
Phone
415-338-7655
Biography:

Dr. Philip Prinz is a Professor in the Department of Special Education at San Francisco State University (SFSU), and on the faculty of the Joint Doctoral Program in Special Education administered by SFSU and the University of California, Berkeley (UCB). Previously, Dr. Prinz was on the faculty at The Pennsylvania State University and the University of Colorado.) 

Educational Background

Dr. Prinz completed a B.A. in Comparative Literature at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA); an M.S. in Journalism at Northwestern University; an M.S. in Speech, Language & Hearing Sciences at Boston University; and a doctorate in Applied Psycholinguistics and Special Education at Boston University. Dr. Prinz holds the Certificate of Clinical Competence in Speech & Language from the American Speech, Language and Hearing Association (ASHA) and a License in Speech & Language from the State of California.

Research Interests

Dr. Prinz’s research focuses on atypical language and literacy acquisition in children; language differences and disorders across spoken, written, and signed modalities; American Sign Language (ASL) acquisition and assessment; the relationship between ASL proficiency and English literacy development; and the differentiation between typical vs. atypical language abilities of English language learning children.

Scholarly and Creative Accomplishments and Awards

Dr. Prinz has received research grants from the U.S. Department of Education and was a recipient of Research Fellowships from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation (Germany) and the U.S. Fulbright Commission. Dr. Prinz received an Ed Roberts Senior Fellowship from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) and the University of California, Berkeley.

Picture of SF State Logo
Position:
Professor
Phone
415-338-7653
Biography:
Mary Requa
Position:
Assistant Professor
Phone
415-338-3428
Biography:
Picture of Nancy Robinson
Position:
Professor
Phone
415-405-2170
Biography:

Nancy B. Robinson is a professor at San Francisco State University in the Communicative Disorders Program and currently the Interim Chair of the Department. In her teaching and research, Dr. Robinson has built curriculum resources in Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) including the AAC Conversation Club, a group meeting for young adults to practice conversation skills and to teach future SLPs to be effective communication partners with individuals who use AAC as their primary means of communication. For many years, she worked at the University of Hawaii with the Center on Disability Studies with a team of faculty and students in health, education, and social science who developed interdisciplinary education models to support individuals with disabilities and their families. Recently, Dr. Robinson co-authored a book with Dr. Kathleen Sadao titled Assistive Technology for Young Children: Creating Inclusive Environments. Dr. Robinson and Dr. Gloria Soto have co-directed two personnel preparation grants funded by the U.S. Department of Education/Office of Special Education Programs. These grants, “Collaborative AAC Services in Inclusive Early Intervention Settings” and “Collaborating for Language, Literacy and Augmentative Systems in Schools” (Project CLLASS), were designed to prepare SLPs and special educators with specialization in AAC. Dr. Robinson and Dr. Soto just published a new book: AAC in the Schools, Best Practices for Intervention.

 

Educational Background

  • Education, Area of Special Education/Early Childhood Special Education, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington - 1987, Ph.D.
  • Speech Communication/Speech and Hearing Sciences, Portland State University, Portland, Oregon - 1975, M.S.
  • Speech Communication/ Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara - 1971, B.S.

Certification and Licenses

  • Certificate of Clinical Competence in Speech-Language Pathology, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (1977- Present)
  • California State License in Speech and Language Pathology, Speech Language and Audiology Licensing Board (1999-Present)

 

Selected Publications

  • Robinson, N. & Soto, G. (2014). AAC in the Schools: Best Practices for Intervention. Verona, WI: Attainment Company.
  • Sadao, K. & Robinson, N. (2010) Assistive Technology for Young Children: Creating Inclusive Learning Environments. Brookes Publishing, Inc.: Baltimore, MD.
  • Sadao, K. & Robinson, N. (2007). Handbook on Developing and Evaluating Interagency Collaboration in Early Childhood Special Education Programs. Supporting Early Education Development Systems (SEEDS), CA: California Department of Education Press.
  • Robinson, N. (2012). The Doctoral degree in Special Education: Contributions to Speech-Language Pathology.Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, Division 10. American Speech-Language and Hearing Association Perspectives, 15, No. 2, 58-62.
  • Robinson, N. & Sadao, K. (January, 2011). Emergent Literacy in Early AAC. California Speech-Language and Hearing Association Magazine, January 10-11
  • Robinson, N. B., Graham, M. S., Epstein, L.  & Graham, B. J. (2008, April 15). Strategic Planning in CSD Programs: The San Francisco State Example. The American Speech-Language and Hearing Association Leader. Available at: http://www.asha.org/Publications/leader/2008/080415/080415d.htm
  • Robinson, N. & Solomon-Rice, P. (2009). Supporting collaborative teams and families in
  • AAC.). In Practically Speaking: Language, Literacy, and Academic Development for Students with AAC Needs. Soto, G. & Zangari, C. (Eds.). Baltimore, MD: Paul H.
  • Brookes.
  • Robinson, N. & Robb, M. (2008). Early communication and assessment: A dynamic process. In Language and Communication Disorders in Children, Sixth Edition. Bernstein, D. & Tiegerman-Farber, E. (Eds). Boston: Allyn & Bacon.
  • Sadao, K. C., Robinson, N. B., & Grant, D. (Feb/Mar 2007). It’s all about access: Getting the word out about assistive technology in early intervention. Invited publication. Closing the Gap Newsletter, 25, 6, p. 1, 9-11.
  • Robinson, N. B. & Sadao, K. C. (2005). Person-focused learning: A collaborative teaching model to prepare future AAC professionals. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 21, 2, 149-163.

 

Awards

  • 2014 -  Honors of the Association, California Speech-Language and Hearing Association
  • 2013 -  Fellows of the Association, California Speech-Language and Hearing Association

 

Picture of Sandra Rosen
Position:
Professor
Phone
415-338-1245
Biography:

Dr. Rosen is coordinator of the Program in Orientation & Mobility (O&M). She is internationally known for her work in the field, including the development of new teaching approaches in O&M and methods of teaching mobility to people who have both physical and visual impairments. Dr. Rosen has also helped develop O&M professional preparation programs in other countries and is a frequent speaker at international conferences. Her current research interests include the facilitation of balance in children born with visual impairments and the facilitation of proprioceptive awareness in teaching motor and mobility skills.

 

Educational Background

1986    Ph.D. Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee

                  Education and Human Development

1978    M.A. San Francisco State University, San Francisco, California

                  Education of Exceptional Children - Orientation and Mobility

1976    B.S. University of Illinois, Chicago, Illinois

                  Allied Health Services - Physical Therapy

 

Selected Publications

  • Rosen, S. (2014). Step-by-Step: An Interactive Guide to Mobility Techniques. Louisville, KY: American Printing House for the Blind. This is the first and only interactive computer program used in the professional preparation of O&M specialists.
  • Rosen, S. & Pogrund, R. (in press).  Motor Development. In R. Pogrund & N. Griffin-Shirley (Eds.). Invited book chapter. Partners in Orientation and Mobility: Collaboration with Other Professionals Working with Children with Blindness or Visual Impairment. New York: American Foundation for the Blind.
  • Cmar, J. & Rosen, S. (in press). Environmental adaptations. In R. Pogrund & N. Griffin-Shirley (Eds.). Invited book chapter. Partners in Orientation and Mobility: Collaboration with Other Professionals Working with Children with Blindness or Visual Impairment. New York: American Foundation for the Blind.

 

Grants/awards

2016    Lawrence E. Blaha Award, Association for the Education and Rehabilitation of the Blind and Visually Impaired, Orientation & Mobility Division

2012    Meritorious Achievement Award, Association for the Education and Rehabilitation of the Blind and Visually Impaired, Northern California Chapter

1994    Berdell "Pete" Wurzburger Award, California Assn. of Orientation and Mobility Specialists

1990    Access Award, American Foundation for the Blind

1988    Award for Outstanding Service, Texas Chapter of the Association for Education and Rehabilitation of the Blind and Visually Impaired (AER)

Ting Siu Biography
Position:
Assistant Professor
Phone
(415) 338-1080
Biography:

Twitter: @TVI_ting

Dr. Ting is a Teacher of Students with Visual Impairments (TVI) and assistant professor in the Program for Visual Impairments in the Department of Special Education. Her primary teaching responsibilities include method courses in visual impairment (VI) such as Medical, Educational, and Rehabilitative Implications of Visual Impairment; Special Populations; Issues in VI; Assessment Strategies and coordination of student teachers and related seminar program. Ting’s research prioritizes connections between research and practice. Her areas of interest and work span the follow areas: Role of communities of practice to support itinerant teachers’ professional development; Development of educational practices and technology that support multimedia accessibility; Teacher adoption of technology including professional use, assessment, and implementation with students.

Educational Background

  • Ph.D, University of California at Berkeley & San Francisco State University, 2015
  • M.A., University of Arizona, 2006
  • B.S., Boston University, 2002

Recent Publications

  • Morash, V. S., Siu, Y. T. (2016). Social predictors of assistive technology proficiency among Teachers of Students with Visual Impairments. ACM Transactions on Accessible Computing (TACCESS), 9(4). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/0000000.0000000
  • Siu, Y. (2016). Designing for all learners. Educational Designer, 3(9).
  • Siu, Y. (2016). A Virtual Water Cooler: The Ecology of an Online Community of Practice to Support Teachers’ Informal Learning (doctoral dissertation). University of California, Berkeley. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.1163.5605
  • Morash, V. S., Siu, Y-T., Miele, J. A., Hasty, L., & Landau, S. (2015). Guiding novice web workers in making image descriptions using templates. ACM Transactions on Accessible Computing (TACCESS), 7(4), 12.
  • D’Andrea, F. M., Siu, Y. (2015). Students with visual impairments: Considerations and effective practices for technology use. In D. Edyburn (Ed.), Advances in Special Education Technology, Vol. 1, Efficacy of Assistive Technology Interventions (pp. 111-138). United Kingdom: Emerald.
  • Siu, Y., Morash, V. (2014). Teachers of students with visual impairments and their use of assistive technology: Measuring teachers’ proficiency and their identification with a Community of Practice. Journal of Visual Impairment and Blindness, 108, 384-398
  • Siu, Y. (2013). This mattered to me. Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness. 107(3), 106-108.

Recent Grants/Awards

Consultant (2016-2017)

Disability Communications Fund

Awardee (2016)

CIRCL Cyberlearning Buddy

Awardee (2015)

TEACH California Distinguished Teacher

Awardee (2014)

American Printing House for the Blind Scholar

Fellow (2011-2015)

National Leadership Consortium in Sensory Disabilities (NLCSD)

Awardee (2006)

Presidential Volunteer Service Award

Collaborative Partners

  • Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute
  • San Francisco Lighthouse for the Blind
  • Touch Graphics, Inc.
  • Benetech (DIAGRAM Center, Bookshare)
  • UC Berkeley
  • Perkins School for the Blind
  • Bay Area public school districts
  • NYC Department of Education
Picture of Patti Solomon-Rice
Position:
Associate Professor
Phone
415-338-7652
Biography:

Patti Solomon-Rice is an Associate Professor and Clinic Director in the Communicative Disorders Program at San Francisco State University.  She has taught both graduate and undergraduate courses including Advanced Clinical Skills, Motor Speech Disorders, AAC, Language Disorders and Language Development, and each semester she supervises an early intervention toddler clinic at one of SFSU’s two early childhood education centers. She is co-project director of a federally funded grant, Project Building Bridges, which trains graduate students in the knowledge and skills needed to provide services for culturally and linguistically diverse children benefitting from augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). Her research interests are in the area of augmentative and alternative communication, focusing on language development and early intervention services.  Patti is actively involved in a variety of professional activities. In California, she has been a member of the Speech-Language Pathology, Audiology, and Hearing Aid Dispensers Board since 2012. Nationally, she completed a 4-year term on the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association’s (ASHA) Board of Ethics in 2016, having served as 2015 Chair.  In 2017 she was a topic co-chair of the 2017 ASHA convention for Language in Infants, Toddlers and Preschoolers. In 2017 she also began a 4-year term on ASHA’s Council for Clinical Certification (CFCC).

 

Educational Background

  • University of California at Berkeley/San Francisco State University, 2010, Ph.D. Special Education
  • San Francisco State University 1992 Master of Business Administration
  • University of Montana 1980 M.C.S.D. Speech-Language Pathology
  • University of Wisconsin at Madison 1977 B.S. Speech-Language Pathology

 

Certification, Licenses and Credentials

  • Certification of Clinical Competence in Speech-Language Pathology, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 1980–present
  • State of California License to Practice Speech-Language Pathology, 1980 - present
  • Commission on Teacher Credentialing Clinical Rehabilitative Services Credential to Provide Speech, Language, and Hearing Services in Schools, Lifetime Credential, 1980 - present

 

Recent Publications

  • Epstein, L., Solomon-Rice, P.L., & Yu, B. (in press). Speech/language impairments and communication disorders. In Y. Bui & E. Meyen (eds). Exceptional children in today’s schools: What teachers need to know. Austin: PRO-ED.
  • Solomon-Rice, P.L., Soto, G., & Heidenreich, W. (2017). The impact of presupposition on the syntax and morphology of a child who uses AAC. Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups, SIG 12, Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 2, 13-22.
  • Solomon-Rice, P. (2016). CSHA organization liaison update: Speech-language pathology and audiology and hearing aid dispensers board. CSHA Magazine, 45 (2), 21-22.
  • Solomon-Rice, P.L. & Robinson, N.R. (2015). Clinical supervision and the use of a three-tiered hierarchical approach to evaluate student clinician performance. Perspectives on Administration and Supervision, ASHA Special Interest Group 11, 25, 31-41.
  • Solomon-Rice, P.L. & Soto, G. (2014). Facilitating vocabulary in toddlers using AAC: A preliminary study comparing focused stimulation and augmented input. Communication Disorders Quarterly, 35(4), 16-27.
  • Solomon-Rice, P. & Del Mugnaio, A. (2013). Successfully navigating the speech-language pathology and audiology and hearing aid dispensers board licensure application process. CSHA Magazine, 42 (3) 6-7.
  • Solomon-Rice, P.L. & Yu, B. (2012). ASHA certified speech-language pathologists pursuing related doctoral degrees: An untapped doctoral shortage resource? Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, ASHA Special Interest Group 10, 15, 53-58.
  • Soto, G. & Solomon-Rice, P. (2012). Relación entre experiencia, rehabilitacion y desarrollo del lenguaje. In E. Soro-Camats, C.Basil & C. Rosell (eds). Pluridiscapacidad y contextos de intervención (pp. 99-116). Barcelona, Spain: Universitat de Barcelona (Insitut de Ciéncies de l’Educació). Edición digital.
  • Solomon-Rice, P.L. & Soto, G. (2011). Co-construction as a facilitative factor in supporting the personal narratives of children who use AAC. Communication Disorders Quarterly, 32 (2), 70-82.
  • Solomon-Rice, P. (2011). Best practices for facilitating language development in young children with complex communication needs. CSHA Magazine, 40 (3), 8-9, 16.
  • Robinson, N.R. & Solomon-Rice, P.L. (2009). Supporting collaborative teams and families in AAC. In G. Soto and C. Zangari (Eds.) Practically Speaking: Language, Literacy, and Academic Development for Students with AAC Needs, (pp.289-312). Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes Publishing.
  • Solomon-Rice, P.L. & Soto, G. (2009). Language modeling as an efficacious early language intervention approach with young children demonstrating complex communication needs. Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, ASHA Special Interest Group 12, 21-27.
  • Soto, G., Solomon-Rice, P.L., & Caputo, M. (2009). Enhancing the personal narrative skills for elementary school-aged students who use AAC: The effectiveness of personal narrative intervention. Journal of Communication Disorders, 42, 43-57.

 

Awards

  • 2013 Fellows of the Association, California Speech-Language-Hearing Association
  • 2010 SFSU Joint Doctoral Program in Special Education Distinguished Doctoral Student
Picture of Gloria Soto
Position:
Professor
Phone
415-338-1757
Biography:

Educational Background

  • B.S. (1988), Universidad Pontificia, Spain
  • M.S. (1991)
  • Ph.D. (1994), Purdue University

 

Dr. Gloria Soto is a Professor in the Department of Special Education. She teaches graduate coursework in special education, cultural diversity, augmentative communication and curriculum-based language and communication intervention.

 

Her area of professional expertise is in augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). Her areas of research interest include applied educational issues such as multiculturalism, collaborative teaming, inclusive education and professional preparation, as well as more basic areas such as narrative language in AAC, language development through augmented means and the impact of graphic symbol use on language development. She is a frequent speaker at national and international conferences related to communication intervention and special education. She has published numerous articles and book chapters.

 

Recent Publications

  • Boenisch, J., & Soto, G. (2015). The Oral Core Vocabulary of Typically Developing English-Speaking School-Aged Children: Implications for AAC Practice. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 31, 77-84.
  • Solomon-Rice, P., & Soto, G. (2014). Facilitating vocabulary in toddlers using AAC: A preliminary study comparing focused stimulation and augmented input. Communication Disorders Quarterly, 35, 204-215.
  • Soto, G., & Yu, B. (2014). Considerations for the provision of services to bilingual children who use AAC. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 30, 83-92.
  • Robinson, N., & Soto, G. (2014). AAC in the Schools: Best Practices for Intervention. WI: Attainment.
  • Dukhovny E., & Soto, G. (2013). Speech Generating Devices and Modality of Short-term Word Storage. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 29, 246-258.
  • Soto, G. (2012). Training partners in AAC in culturally diverse families. Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 21 #4, ASHA Division 12, 144-150.
  • Henneberry, S., Kelso, J., & Soto, G. (2012). Using standards-based instruction to teach language to children who use AAC. Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 21 #3, ASHA Division 12, 92-97
  • Soto, G. & Solomon-Rice, P. (2012). Relación entre la experiencia, la rehabilitacion y el desarrollo del lenguaje. In E. Soro, C.Basil & C. Rusell (Eds). Intervención Comunicativa para Alumnos con Pluridiscapacidad (Communication Intervention for Students with Multiple Disabilities). Barcelona, Graó.
  • Solomon-Rice, P.L. & Soto, G. (2011). Co-construction as a facilitative factor in supporting the personal narratives of children who use AAC. Communication Disorders Quarterly, 32, 70-82.
  • Solomon-Rice, P.L. & Soto, G. (2009). Language modeling as an efficacious early language intervention approach with young children demonstrating complex communication needs. Perspectives on Augmentative and Alternative Communication, ASHA Division 12, 21-27.
  • Soto, G. (2009). Academic adaptations for students with AAC needs. In G. Soto & C. Zangari (Eds.), Practically Speaking: Language, Literacy and Academic Development of Students with AAC Needs (Chapter 6 pp. 131-142).  Baltimore, MD: Paul Brookes Publishing Co.
  • Soto, G. & Zangari, C. (2009). Practically Speaking: Language, Literacy and Academic Development of Students with AAC Needs. Baltimore, MD: Paul Brookes Publishing Co.
  • Soto, G., Solomon-Rice, P. & Caputo, M. (2009). Enhancing the personal narrative skills of elementary school-aged students who use AAC:” The effectiveness of personal narrative intervention. Journal of Communication Disorders, 42, 43-57.
  • Soto, G., & Dukhovny, E. (2008). The effect of shared book reading on the acquisition of expressive vocabulary of a 7 year old who uses AAC. Seminars in Speech and Language, 29, 133-145.
  • Soto, G., Yu, B., & Kelso, J. (2008). Effectiveness of multifaceted narrative intervention on the stories told by a 12 year old girl who uses AAC. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 24, 76-87.
  • Soto, G., Yu, B., Henneberry, S. (2007). Supporting the development of narrative skills of an 8 year-old child who uses an augmentative and alternative communication device: Case Study. Child Language Teaching and Therapy, 23, 27-45.
  • Soto, G., Dukohvny, E., & Vestly, T. (2006). Increasing storybook reading for children who use AAC. In L. Justice (Ed.).Clinical approaches to emergent literacy intervention. (chapter 9 pp. 289-320). San Diego, CA: Plural Publishing.
  • Soto, G., & Hartmann, E. (2006) Analysis of narratives produced by four children who use augmentative and alternative communication. Journal of Communication Disorders, 39, 456-480.
  • Soto, G., Hartmann, E., & Wilkins, D. (2006). Exploring the elements of narrative that emerge in the interactions between an 8 year-old child who uses a device and her teacher. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 22, 231-249.
  • Liboiron, N., & Soto, G. (2006). Shared Storybook Reading with a Student who uses AAC: An Intervention Session. Child Language Teaching and Therapy, 22, 69-95.
  • McCord, M.S., & Soto, G. (2004). Perceptions of AAC: An ethnographic investigation of Mexican-American families.Augmentative and Alternative Communication.
  • Hunt, P., Soto, G., Maier, J., Liboiron, N., &, Bae, S. (in press). Collaborative teaming to support preschoolers with severe disabilities who are placed in general education early childhood programs. Topics in Early Childhood Special Education.
  • Soto, G. (in press). Mas alla del habla: Estrategias alternativas al habla en la intervencion en problemas de comunicacion. (Beyond Speech: Alternative Communication Strategies).
  • Arnaiz, P. & Soto, G. (2003). Special education in Spain at the beginning of the 21st century: The challenge to educate in an unequal and multicultural society. Journal of Inclusive Education, 17, 375-388.
  • Hunt, P., Soto, G., Maier, J., & Doering, K., (2003). Collaborative Teaming to Support Students at Risk and Students with Severe Disabilities in General Education Classrooms. Exceptional Children, 69, 315-332.
  • Soto, G., & Wine-Seligman, W. (2003). Childdriven development of alternative communication: A case study. In S. von Tetzchner and N. Grove (Eds.), Augmentative and alternative communication: Developmental issues. (chapter 9 pp. 211-228). London, UK: Whurr.
  • Soto, G., & von Tetzchner, S. (2003). Supporting the development of alternative communication through culturally significant activities in shared educational settings. In S. von Tetzchner and N. Grove (Eds.), Augmentative and alternative communication: Developmental issues. (chapter 13 pp. 287-299). London, UK: Whurr.
  • Soto, G., & Grove, N. (2002). Multimodal transcription in augmentative and alternative communication: Theoretical and methodological considerations. In S. von Tetzchner & J. Clibbens (Eds.) Understanding the theoretical and methodological bases of augmentative and alternative communication. Proceedings of the Sixth Research Symposium of the International Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication. Toronto, Canada: ISAAC.
  • Müller, E., & Soto, G. (2002). Capturing the Complexity of Aided Interactions: A Conversation Analysis Perspective. In S. von Tetzchner & J. Clibbens (Eds.) Understanding the theoretical and methodological bases of augmentative and alternative communication. Proceedings of the Sixth Research Symposium of the International Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication. Toronto, Canada: ISAAC.
  • Sutton, A., Soto, G., & Blockberger, S. (2002). Grammatical Issues in Graphic Symbol Communication. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 18, 192-204.
Picture of Pamela Wolfberg
Position:
Professor
Phone
415-338-7651
Picture of SF State Logo
Position:
Associate Professor
Phone
415-338-3429
Biography:
Betty Yu is an Assistant Professor in the Communicative Disorders Program in Special Education. Before joining the faculty at San Francisco State, she practiced as a speech-
language therapist primarily serving young children and their families in minority communities. Her research interest is in how children's language development interfaces with the development of sociocultural competence. Her current research focuses on the communication experiences of children with autism spectrum disorders and their families within bilingual contexts. She teaches courses related to language development, atypical language development, cultural and linguistic diversity, intervention in young children, and counseling in Communicative Disorders. The emphasis of her clinical instruction is on the provision of family-centered services to support communication development in children on the autism spectrum. She is the co-director of Project Common Ground, a project funded by the U.S. Department of Education to prepare speech-language pathologists to work effectively with diverse children on the autism spectrum. She supervises the Autism Spectrum Communication Clinic.
 
Educational Background
  • University of California at Berkeley/San Francisco State University, 2009, Ph.D. Special Education
  • New York University, 1999, M.A. Speech-Language Pathology
  • University of California at Berkeley, 1996, B.A. Linguistics
 
Certification and Licences
  • Certificate of Clinical Competence in Speech-Language Pathology, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 1999-present
  • California State License in Speech and Language Pathology, Speech Language and Audiology Licensing Board, 1999-present
 
Publications
  • Yu, B. (2013). Issues in bilingualism and heritage language maintenance: Perspectives of minority-language mothers of children with autism spectrum disorders. American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 22(1), 10-24.
  • Solomon-Rice, P. & Yu, B. (2012). ASHA Certified Speech-Language Pathologists Pursuing Doctoral Degrees in Related Areas: An Untapped Doctoral Shortage Resource? Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, 15(2), 53-58.
  • Yu, B. & Epstein, L. (2011). Facilitating critical reflections about disability among students in speech-language pathology.Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, 14, 11-20.
  • Yu, B. & Kashinath, S. (2011). Family-centered care and other labors of love: Culturally competent service delivery for young children and their families. CSHA Magazine, 41(1), 12-13.
  • Yu, B. (2010). Achieving cultural reciprocity in early intervention through a recommitment to family-centered care. CSHA Magazine, 40(1), 8-9.
  • Epstein, L., Nazario, A., & Yu, B. (2009). Evaluation of evidence in evidence-based practice and how library science can help. Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, 12(1), 32-41.
  • Soto, G., Yu, B., Morton, J. (2008). Effectiveness of multifaceted narrative intervention on the stories told by a 12-year old girl who uses AAC. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 24(1), 76-87.
  • Soto, G., Yu, B., Henneberry, S. (2006). Supporting the development of narrative skills of an eight-year old child who uses an augmentative and alternative communication device. Child Language Teaching and Therapy, 23(1), 27-45.
 
Awards
  • 2013 Distinguished Achievement Award, California Speech-Language-Hearing Association
  • 2009 SFSU Joint Doctoral Program in Special Education Distinguished Doctoral Student
  • 2008 Spencer Foundation Mentored Research Fellowship for Doctoral Research

Equity, Leadership Studies, and Instructional Technologies (ELSIT)

Picture of Davide Celoria
Position:
Associate Professor
Phone
415-405-3659
Biography:

Educational Background

  • B.S., Portland State University, Psychology and Social Work
  • M.S., Portland State University, Special Education and Elementary Education 
  • Ed.D., University of California, Berkeley, Leadership for Educational Equity
  • Dr. Celoria is an Assistant Professor of Educational Administration and Leadership in the Equity, Leadership Studies, and Instructional Technologies (ELSIT) Department.

 

Scholarly Interests

Davide’s scholarly interests are in the areas of leading for educational change, functions of educational leadership, and role of the educational leader in school reform and transformation, all from a social justice and equity perspective. This interest includes exploring the relationship among education policy, leadership practices, and teacher practices in a time of increasing complexity given the call for “deeper learning,” “21st-century skills”, and “next generation learning.”

 

Recent Professional Work Experience

Most recently Dr. Celoria was an associate superintendent in the SF Bay area where he led the development, adoption, and implementation of a robust and rigorous new district strategic plan including the district's math plan, language arts/literacy plan, library/media/technology plan, special education plan, and language development plan as aligned to recent research on "deeper learning' and "next generation learning". Davide has also served as both assistant superintendent of prek-8 schools, and executive director of early childhood education programs. Prior to district-level administration, Dr. Celoria led the transformation of a low-performing elementary school, exiting the state's Immediate Intervention/Under-performing Schools Program. He has over ten years of experience as an elementary and special education classroom teacher.

Picture of SF State Logo
Position:
Professor
Phone
415-338-1076
Biography:

Educational Background

Dr. Curtis received her Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1990. Her areas of specialization are quantitative research methods and program evaluation.

 

Research and Teaching Interests

Dr. Curtis's research has focused on statistics education at the undergraduate and graduate level. She teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in educational statistics research methods at SFSU.

 

Image of Patricia Donahue
Position:
Associate Professor
Phone
415-338-6384
Biography:

Patricia Donohue is an Assistant Professor in the Graduate College of Education at San Francisco State University (SFSU) where she serves as the Program Coordinator for the Instructional Technologies Program. She oversees the Master of Arts in Education: Instructional Technologies degree, two instructional design and technology certificates, and the supplementary credential in instructional technologies. Dr. Donohue teaches courses in: Theoretical Foundations of Instructional Technologies, Design Usability and Formative Evaluation, Teaching and Learning with Emerging Technologies, Instructional Systems Design, and courses in mobile learning and social learning methods.

 

Dr. Donohue received her Ph.D. in Communications and Information Sciences (CIS) from the University of Hawai`i at Manoa. The CIS degree is an interdisciplinary program with a primary and secondary area of emphasis required. Dr. Donohue’s Primary emphasis area was Human-Computer Interaction and her Secondary emphasis was in Communications Theory. She was a graduate of San Francisco State University with an M.A. in Education: Instructional Technologies, a Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in English and minor in Biology, and Standard Secondary Credential with the same major/minor emphases. Dr. Donohue taught for five years in public schools at the secondary level at Castlemont High School, an urban school in Oakland, California and for Middletown Unified School District, a highly rural school in Lake County, California. She went on to teach Community College and graduate level courses at two universities prior to joining the faculty at SFSU.

 

Dr. Donohue’s research interests arose out of eight years work for two federal grants promoting new technologies and their application to STEM education in K-12. She has continued her interests in the applications of technologies and effective environments for improved learning. Dr. Donohue’s current research is investigating use of Studio-Based Learning approaches and the development of a Design Studio for collaboration between faculty and students. She has, for the past 10 years been interested in the cultural applications of technology and pedagogy; particularly facilitating “Native Ways of Knowing” using virtual instruction. One of her goals is to increase the number of students entering engineering and emergent technology fields, recognizing that ethnic, cultural, and gender barriers often triple the challenges to entrance. As part of her efforts to grow an ITEC Design Studio, Dr. Donohue sponsors student experiments in the application of technologies to enhance learning. For example, two such projects are: 1) A Kinect 3-D virtual game for manipulation of geometry concepts, and 2. Interactive music performance tools for a large-size class or MOOC.

 

Dr. Donohue maintains membership in several professional organizations. She was a member of the first ISTE *NETS writing team to develop the Technology Standards for Teachers. She has presented at numerous national conferences and been an invited speaker to the California Curriculum and Instruction Steering Committee symposium. Through her work on two federal grants, a Technology Innovation Challenge Grant from the U.S. Department of Education, and a National Science Foundation Rural Systemic Initiative grant, Dr. Donohue was involved in the design and formation of two continuing websites for teacher professional development and content delivery in STEM: Hawaii Networked Learned Communities (hnlc.org) and NatureShift Linking Learning to Life (natureshift.org).

 

Image of Jeff Duncan-Andrade
Position:
Associate Professor
Phone
415-338-3287
Biography:

Educational Background

  • Ph.D., M.A., and B.A.,  University of California, Berkeley

Jeff Duncan-Andrade, is an Associate Professor with a joint appointment in the Departments of  Equity, Leadership Studies and Instructional Technologies in the Graduate College of Education and the Department of Raza Studies in the College of Ethnic Studies at San Francisco State University. He is also Director of the Educational Equity Initiative at the Institute for Sustainable Economic, Educational, and Environmental Design (ISEEED). 

In addition to these duties, he continues as a high school teacher in East Oakland where for the past 21 years he has practiced and studied the use of critical pedagogy in urban schools (see www.rosesinconcrete.org). He currently teaches English Literature at Fremont High School in East Oakland where he directs the East Oakland Step to College Program. Before joining the faculty at SFSU, Duncan-Andrade taught English and coached in the Oakland public schools for 10 years, and completed his doctoral studies at the University of California, Berkeley. Duncan-Andrade has lectured around the world about the elements of effective teaching in schools serving poor and working class children. He works closely with teachers, school site leaders, and school district officials nationally, and as far abroad as Brazil and New Zealand, to help them develop classroom practices and school cultures that foster self-confidence, esteem, and academic success among all students. His research interests and publications span the areas of urban schooling and curriculum change, urban teacher development and retention, critical pedagogy, and cultural and ethnic studies. 

He has authored numerous journal articles and book chapters on the conditions of urban education, urban teacher support and development, and effective pedagogy in urban settings that have been published in leading journals such as Harvard Educational Review and Qualitative Studies in Education.  He recently completed two books, The Art of Critical Pedagogy: Possibilities for Moving from Theory to Practice in Urban Schools and What a Coach Can Teach a Teacher, with Peter Lang Publishing.  These books focus on effective pedagogical strategies for urban schools. He is currently completing his third book on the core competencies of highly effective urban educators with Routledge Press

Publications

  • Duncan-Andrade, J. (2013). “Deconstructing the Doublethink Aimed at Dismantling Ethnic Studies in Tucson” in Romero, A. and Cammarota, J. (Ed.), Raza Studies: The Public Option of Educational Revolution.  University of Arizona Press.
  • Duncan-Andrade, J. (2012). “A Glass Half-Full” in Bank Street Occasional Papers.
  • http://bankstreet.edu/occasional-paper-series/27/part-iii/glass-half-full/.
  • Duncan-Andrade, J. (2011). “The Principal Facts: New Directions for Teacher Education” in Arnetha Ball & Cynthia Tyson (Eds), Studying Diversity in Teacher Education. Washington, DC: American Educational Research Association.
  • Duncan-Andrade, J. (2010).  “Note to Educators: Hope Required When Growing Roses in Concrete” in Gretchen Brion-Meisels, Kristy Cooper, Sherry Deckman, Christina Dobbs, Chantal Francois, Thomas Nikundiwe, & Carla Shalaby (Eds), Humanizing Education: Critical Alternatives to Reform, pp. 231-243. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Publishing Group.
  • Duncan-Andrade, J.  (2007). “Gangstas, Wankstas, and Ridas:  Defining, Developing, and Supporting Effective Teachers in Urban Schools”.  International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, vol. 20 no. 6, November-December, pp. 617-638.
  • Duncan-Andrade, J. (2007). “Urban Youth and the Counter-Narration of Inequality”. Transforming Anthropology, 15:1, pp. 26-37.
  • Morrell, E. and Duncan-Andrade, J. (2006).  “Popular Culture and Critical Media Pedagogy in Secondary Literacy Classrooms”.  International Journal of Learning, vol. 12, 2005/2006. 
  • Duncan-Andrade, J. (2005). “Developing Social Justice Educators”.  Educational Leadership, March 2005, vol 62: 6, pp. 70-73.
  • Duncan-Andrade, J. (2005).  “An Examination of the Sociopolitical History of Chicanos and its Relationship to School Performance”.  Urban Education, 40:6, pp. 576-605.  
  • Duncan-Andrade, J. and Morrell, E. (2005). “Turn Up That Radio, Teacher: Popular Cultural Pedagogy in New Century”. Journal of School Leadership, March 2005, vol 15: pp.  284-304.
  • Duncan-Andrade, J. (2004). “Your Best Friend or Your Worst Enemy: Youth Popular Culture, Pedagogy and Curriculum at the Dawn of the 21st Century”.  Review of Education, Pedagogy and Cultural Studies, 26:4, pp.  313-337.
  • Duncan-Andrade, J. (2004).  “Toward Teacher Development for the Urban in Urban Teaching.”  Teaching Education Journal, 15:4, pp. 339-350.
  • Morrell, E. and Duncan-Andrade, J.  (2002).  “Toward a Critical Classroom Discourse:  Promoting Academic Literacy Through Engaging Hip-Hop Culture with Urban Youth”.  English Journal, 91:6, p. 88-92. Youngstown, OH: Youngstown State University Press.

 

picture of Doris Flowers
Position:
Department Chair
Phone
415-338-2614
Biography:

Dr. Doris Flowers is a Professor in the College of Education at San Francisco State University where she serves as the Co-coordinator of the Center for Adult Education as well as the Equity and Social Justice Program. Dr. Flowers teaches courses in Equity and Social Justice and Adult Education. Originally from Washington, DC, Dr. Flowers has served as faculty and research associate in the Communications Department at Purdue University and has taught at the University of Virginia, Howard University and the University of the District of Columbia.

 

Dr. Flowers received her Bachelor’s and Masters’ degree from the University of the District of Columbia in Speech and Language Pathology. Her Ph.D. was received from the University of Virginia in 1991 in education with a major in language and communication and a minor in neuroscience.  She is a speech-language pathologist by profession and has worked in various educational and clinical settings with adults and children.  Over the past 20 years, Dr. Flowers has broadened the scope of her research to include how language is racialized and used to exclude. She has conducted research focusing on an African Centered perspective in language and literacy in adult learning.  She has taught in the areas of race, class, language, gender, education policy and African Centered perspectives in teaching and learning.

 

Dr. Flowers’ research over the past 20 years has focused on examining the impact of race, class, gender and language issues in adult educational settings as well as other work environments. Dr. Flowers has written many journal articles and books chapters on language as it is related to cultural and race study. She has served as member and chair of the 2008-2009 Adult Education Research Conference (AERC) Steering Committee. Over the past 10 year, Dr. Flowers has also served as member of the AERC African Diaspora Preconference and the past 6 years has coordinated the conference planning. She has made many presentations at international, national, state, and local conferences and published numerous articles on language and race and continues to contribute to the literature in the field of Adult Education as well Equity and Social Justice.

 

picture of David Hemphill
Position:
Professor
Phone
415-338-2689
Biography:
Educational Background:
  • A.B., 1971, University of California, Berkeley, Political Science and Asian Languages
  • M.A., 1980, University of San Francisco, Bilingual Vocational Education
  • Ed.D., 1984, University of San Francisco, Educational Organization and Leadership

Dr. Hemphill's teaching and research interests include multicultural and international education, cultural studies in education, critical, postmodern and postcolonial theories of education, popular culture, adult education, literacy, second language acquisition, and educational research methods. Prior to coming to the university he worked for ten years as a language teacher and program director in community-based organizations serving Asian immigrants in Oakland and San Francisco. He teaches the following courses: ISED 738 (Critical & Postmodern Pedagogies), ISED 740 (Education & Globalization: Issues in Comparative and International Education), and ISED 748 (Culture, Cognition, and Power Issues in Education). He led the development of two Doctoral programs in Educational Leadership (one in collaboration with UC Berkeley, the other an independent CSU program), pioneered several international initiatives, and served as Associate Dean for Graduate Studies in the College of Education and Chair of the Department of Equity, Leadership Studies, and Instructional Technologies (ELSIT). He is currently a faculty member in the ELSIT Department.

Dr. Hemphill is also a trombonist and musical arranger.

You can watch Dr. Hemphill talk about his work and teaching on this link:

YouTube Video - About Dr. David Hemphill


Selected Publications:
  • Hemphill, D. & Blakely, E. (In Press). English language learning in globalized third spaces: From monocultural standardization to hybridized translanguaging. In D. Macedo (Ed.), Decolonizing foreign language education. Boulder, CO: Paradigm Publishers.
  • Asera, R., Gabriner, R., & Hemphill, D (2017). Starting and Sustaining Educational Partnerships: Two Case Studies of Intersegmental Innovation in California. San Francisco: College Futures Foundation.
  • Asera, R., Gabriner, R., & Hemphill, D (2017). What Makes a Partnership Work? San Francisco: College Futures Foundation.
  • Lee, M.Y., Hemphill, D., & Perea, J. (2016). Teaching in transnational spaces: A short-term study abroad journey in China. In S. Guo (Ed.), Spotlight on China: Chinese education in the globalized world. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Sense Publishers.
  •  Hemphill, D. & Blakely, E. (2015). Language, nation, and identity in the classroom: Legacies of modernity and coloniality in Education. New York: Peter Lang Publishing.
  • Hemphill, D. (2014). An invitation to postocolonial pedagogy. The Journal of Pedagogies, Spring 2014. Tokyo, Japan: Chuo University. (In Japanese)
  • Celoria, D. & Hemphill, D. (2014). Coaching from the coaches’ perspective: A process-oriented focus. International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, 3(1), 72-85.
  • Lee, M.Y. , Hemphill, D. & Perea, J. (2014). Teaching transformation in the context of international and comparative education. In J. Wu, (Ed.). Internationalization of Higher Education. Guangzhou, China: South Normal China University Press. (Bilingual: Chinese & English).
  • Hemphill, D. & Leskowitz, S. (2013). DIY activists: Self-directed informal learning, communities of practice, and radical knowledge-sharing. Adult Education Quarterly, 63(1), February 2013, 57-77.
  • Hemphill, D. & Shao, L. (2012). Chinese volunteer teachers in Thailand: Training and support needed to establish a career in a new culture. Proceedings of the 8th Biennial Conference of the Comparative Education Society of Asia. Bangkok: Chulalongkorn University, 2012.
  • Lee, M.Y., Hemphill, D. & Perea, J. (2009). Teaching for transformation: Structured cross-cultural experience in a transnational context. Proceedings of the Adult Education Research Conference, 50, 212-217, 2009.
  • Appell, G. & Hemphill, D. (2006). American popular music: A multicultural history. New York: Thomson/Schirmer, 2006.
  • Ferrigno, J., Hemphill, D., & Lee, M.Y. (2005). Teaching for empowerment: Liberatory pedagogy, social change, and gender dynamics. Proceedings of the Adult Education Research Conference. Athens, GA: University of Georgia.
  • Hemphill, D. & Olmos, L. (2003). Postcolonial perspectives on reform and teacher education: North and south. The Review of Education/Pedagogy/Cultural Studies, 25(1), Winter 2003.
  • Hemphill, D. (2000). Incorporating postmodernist perspectives into adult education. In V. Sheared and P. Sissel (Eds.), Making space: Reframing theory and practice in adult education. New York: Greenwood Press.
  • Hemphill, D. (1999). The blues and the scientific method: Codified cultural schemas and understanding adult cognition from a multicultural perspective. Proceedings of the Adult Education Research Conference. Dekalb, IL: Northern Illinois University.
  •  Merrifield, J., Bingman, M.B., Hemphill, D., & Bennett deMarrais, K.P. (1997). Life at the margins: Literacy, language, and technology in everyday life. New York: Columbia University Teachers College Press.
  • Hemphill, D. (1996). Flexibility, innovation, and collaboration: A regional view of community-based organizations in adult education. Adult Learning, 7(6), 21-30.
  • Hemphill, D. (1996). Family literacy: Issues of culture, gender, and hidden curriculum. Proceedings of the Adult Education Research Conference. Tampa, FL: University of South Florida.
  • Hemphill, D. (1995). Media, technology, and literacy in immigrant and multicultural contexts. School of Education Review, 5, Spring 1995. San Francisco, CA: San Francisco State University.
  • Hemphill, D. (1994). Critical rationality from a cross-cultural perspective. Proceedings of the Adult Education Research Conference. Knoxville, TN: University of Tennessee, Knoxville, 1994.
  • Hemphill, D. (1993). Future directions for the field of adult education. Proceedings of the Commission of Professors of Adult Education.
  • Hemphill, D. & Tibbetts, J. (1993). The adult learner: Adult education instructor training guide. Washington, DC: Pelavin Associates and Office of Vocational and Adult Education (OVAE), U.S. Department of Education.
  • Hemphill, D. (1992). Thinking hard about culture in adult education: Not a trivial pursuit. Adult Learning. 3(7), May 1992, 8-12.
  • Valadez, G. & Hemphill, D. (1990). Uniting postmodern education in Europe and elsewhere: Consensus and caution. School of Education Review, 3, Spring 1991. San Francisco, CA: San Francisco State University.
  • "Making Sense to Teachers About Teaching." Adult Learning. May, 1990.
  • Hemphill, D., Pfaffenberger, B., & Hockman, B. (1989). The working culture, Book 1:Cross-cultural communication for new Americans; Book 2: Career Development for New Americans. New York: Prentice-Hall/Regents.
  • Savage, K.L., How, M., Yeung, L.S., & Hemphill, D. (1982). English that works: Integrated competency-based bilingual vocational ESL, Books I & II.  Chicago, IL: Scott, Foresman, and Company.

 

Picture of Helen Hyun
Position:
Professor
Email
Phone
415-338-6449
Biography:

Dr. Helen Hyun is a Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies in Education. She received her master’s degree and doctorate in education policy from Harvard University. She has taught classes at the undergraduate, master’s and doctoral level at SFSU and also at UC Berkeley where she was a visiting professor in the Joint Doctoral Program from 2005-10. Dr. Hyun’s teaching and research interests include higher education policy, mixed methods research, and equity issues in education. Dr. Hyun has authored two commissioned studies for the Civil Rights Project at Harvard and UCLA, one on affirmative action and the other a recent study on the impact of the CSU budget crisis (http://www.civilrightsproject.ucla.edu/). Dr. Hyun is also co-author of one of the leading research methods textbooks in the country (http://www.worldcat.org/title/how-to-design-and-evaluate-research-in-education/oclc/694616478?referer=di&ht=edition). 

 

Dr. Hyun was raised in San Francisco and now resides in the East Bay with her husband and two young daughters.

Picture of Ming-Yeh Lee
Position:
Professor
Phone
415-338-1061
Biography:

Dr. Lee’s teaching and research interests include adult learning theories, immigrant adult leaners, impact of interlocking power system on educational contexts, and transformative learning in the cross-cultural setting. She currently teach, advise, and co-coordinate Adult Education MA & credential program and Equity and Social Justice MA program. Dr. Lee is the recipient of an outstanding teaching award in 1996 and a national research award in 1999. She has presented at international conferences and published in areas of adult immigrant students, adult learning, and equity & social justice in education. She has also served her professional community by playing a leadership role in hosting international research conference in 2003 and serving editorial board for Adult Education Quarterly, Adult Learning and Horizon, three major publications in Adult Education. She served as university liaison for a community based literacy program, long-term consultant for a Chinese American non-profit organization and has being involved in college-wide international initiatives.

 

Educational Background

  • B.A. 1989, National Cheng-chi University, Taiwan,
Major in Education and Minor in English Literature
  • M.Ed. 1992, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Curriculum and Instruction
  • Ed.D.,1997, University of Georgia, Athens, Adult Education with Graduate Certificate in Women’s Studies

 

Selected Publications:

  •  Lee, M., Hemphill, D., Perea, J. (in press). Teaching transformation in the context of international and comparative education. J Wu, (Ed.). Internationalization of Higher Education. Guangzhou, China: South Normal China University Press. (Bilingual: Chinese & English)
  •  Lee, M. (2010). Expanding the racialized discourse—An Asian American perspective.In V. Sheared, S. Brookfield., J. Johnson-Bailey., & S. Colins, III. (Eds.), The Handbook on Race and Racism in Adult and Higher Education: A Dialogue among Adult Educators. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
  •  Huang, H & Lee, M. (2010). Teaching abacus in a multicultural context. The Proceedings of 2010 World Abacus Day Conference, p. 30-40. Bilingual (Chinese & English).
  •  Lee, M., & Jalipa, A.(Eds.). (2010) The Fifth Asian Diaspora Pre-conference Proceedings. San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA.
  •  Lee, M. (2009). Instructional excellence for whom? Pedagogies for the marginalized. The Proceedings of the Fifth Annual Conference on Teacher Career Planning and Professional Development Proceedings, 37-43.
  •  Lee, M., Hemphill, D., Perea, J. (2009). Teaching for transformation: Structured cross- cultural experience in transnational context. Adult Education Research Conference proceedings, 50, 212-217.

 

Courses taught at SFSU

  • ISED 717 Social Foundations of Cultural and Equity in Education (3 units)
  • ISED 735 Seminar on the Adult Learner (3 units)
  • ISED 739 Education and Community Development: Equity and Diversity (3 units)
  • ISED 745 Practicum in a multicultural education setting (3units)
  • ISED 780 Adult Basic and Literacy Education (3 units)
  • ISED 781 Teaching Improvement in Adult and Workplace Education (3 units)
  • ISED 783 Educational Technologies in Adult Learning (1 unit)
  • ISED 891 Special Issue: Conference Planning and Practice in Adult Education (3units)
  • ISED 891 Educational Practice in Transnational Spaces (3units)
  • ISED 895/898 Culminating Experience: Field Study & Mater Thesis (3 units)
  • ISED 897 Advanced Seminar of Education Research (3 units)
  • ISED 899 Special Study (1-3 units)
Picture of Zahira Merchant
Position:
Assistant Professor
Phone
415-338-6384
Biography:
  • Ph.D., Texas A&M University, Educational Technology, 2012
  • M.S., Texas A&M University, Educational Human Resource Development, 2007
  • Postgraduate Diploma, South Indian Education Society, Mumbai, India, 2001
  • Postgraduate Diploma, Narsee Monjee Institute of Management Studies, Mumbai, India, 1999
  • B.Commerce, Mithibai Motiram Kundanani College, Mumbai, India, 1995

 

Zahira Merchant is an Assistant Professor of Instructional Technologies in the Graduate College of Education at San Francisco State University (SFSU). Before joining SF State, Merchant was the project manager and postdoctoral research associate in Knowledge for Algebra Teaching and Equity, a National Science Foundation-funded project studying the use of innovative 3-D virtual environment technology in the classroom. Merchant is originally from India, where she served as a human resource trainer, teacher, teacher educator, curriculum developer, principal, and program evaluator for over ten years.

 

Merchant’s research interests are in game-based learning environments, learning assessment using digital tools, visuo-spatial cognition, research methods in the field of instructional/educational technology, ill-structured problem solving strategies, and mobile technologies.

 

Merchant won the Certificate of Merit Award from the Association of Educational Communication and Technology Organization for a game she designed and developed for nursing education. She is also the recipient of the Robert Gagne Award of the Association of Educational Communication and Technology Organization for outstanding dissertation. Merchant’s research has been published in top-tier peer-reviewed journals in the field of educational technology. 

 

Selected Publications:

  • Merchant, Z., Goetz, E., Keeney-Kennicutt, W., Cifuentes, L., & Davis, T, J. (2014). Effectiveness of virtual reality-based instruction on students learning outcomes in K-12 and Higher Education: A meta-analysis. Computers & Education, 70, 29- 40.
  • Merchant, Z., Goetz, E., Keeney-Kennicutt, W., Kwok, O., Cifuentes, L., & Davis, T, J. (2013).  Exploring 3-D Virtual Reality Technology for Spatial ability and Chemistry Achievement. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 29, 579 - 590.
  • Merchant, Z., Goetz, E., Keeney-Kennicutt, W., Kwok, O., Cifuentes, L., & Davis, T, J. (2012). The learner characteristics, features of desktop 3d virtual reality environments, and college chemistry instruction: A structural equation modeling analysis. Computers & Education, 59, 551- 568.
Pictire of Jacob PereaNew Mexico State University, B.S. Biology San Francisco State University, M.A. Community Education University of California, Berkeley, Ed.D. Higher Education Policy Credential: California Lifetime Credential Elementary Education   My main area of research interest area is social justice. I have worked with school-age youth who are not traditional college-going to create a program, Step to College, that works to increase graduation and college attendance. The program is located in schoo
Position:
Professor
Email
Phone
415-338-2687
Biography:
  • New Mexico State University, B.S. Biology
  • San Francisco State University, M.A. Community Education
  • University of California, Berkeley, Ed.D. Higher Education Policy
  • Credential: California Lifetime Credential Elementary Education

 

My main area of research interest area is social justice. I have worked with school-age youth who are not traditional college-going to create a program, Step to College, that works to increase graduation and college attendance. The program is located in schools in San Francisco and San Mateo counties. It serves 200+ students each year.

 

My area of teaching is varied, including undergraduate, credential, graduate-level, and high school courses. These classes are in the areas of cultural education, policy and implementation, bilingual education, policy and pedagogy, and general education.

 

I am also interested in international education and coordinate and work with student teachers in a Chinese Language credential program as part of a collaboration with the Nanhai campus of South China Normal University, Guangzhou China.

 

In addition I am active in San Francisco Bay Aria Latino and American Indian communities in the area of education and alcohol and drug abatement.

Picture of SF State Logo
Position:
Professor
Phone
520-977-2253
Biography:

Dr. Stanley Pogrow has a Ph.D. in Educational Administration from Stanford University, and is currently a Research  Professor of Educational Leadership at San Francisco State University.  He was a coordinator of the joint doctoral program in Educational Leadership for Equity, in conjunction with the University of California at Berkeley.  Previous positions were at: University of Illinois, USC, and the University of Arizona.  UCEA listed him as one of the top scholars in the field of Educational Leadership.

 

Dr. Pogrow specializes in (a) Education policy for reducing the achievement gap, and (b) in the design, implementation, and dissemination of more powerful large-scale learning environments for students born into poverty, and the role such environments play in school improvement.  He is the author of 4 books, and more than 110 articles/book chapters.  He has made over 250 presentations around the country and internationally.  Dr. Pogrow has also been the sole PI on $3 million in R & D grants.  His work has been funded by: The National Science Foundation, U.S. Department of Education, Arizona Department of Education, Edna McConnell Clark Foundation, Ford Foundation, MacArthur Foundation, IBM and Apple.

 

In addition to extensive writing and presenting on school reform policy, Dr. Pogrow is a leading designer and disseminator of school reform programs to accelerate the learning of low-income and minority students.  He is the developer of the Higher Order Thinking Skills (HOTS) Project, a pure thinking skills approach to Title I and LD in grades 4-8.  HOTS combines the use of Socratic dialogue, drama, and technology, and has been used in approxi­mately 2600 schools in 48 states.  HOTS has won numerous state and Federal awards and has been one of the most successful reform efforts for educationally disadvantaged students.  Dr. Pogrow has also debunked the supposed effectiveness of some of the most widely used interventions targeted to marginalized populations.

 

Publications include:

  • Pogrow, S. (2011). “Success for All Does Not Work: An Exemplar for Why Title I Should Not Mandate Using Specific Programs ‘Proven to be Effective’, Education Week.
  • Pogrow, S. (2008). Teaching Content Outrageously:How to Captivate All Students and Accelerate Learning.  Jossey-Bass. (San Francisco).
  • Pogrow , S. (2006). “Restructuring High-Poverty Elementary Schools for Success: A Description of the Hi-Perform School Design.” Phi Delta Kappan, pp. 223-229.
  • Pogrow, S. (2005). HOTS Revisited: A Thinking Development Approach to Reducing the Learning Gap After Grade 3. Phi Delta Kappan, pp. 64-75.
  • Pogrow, S. (2004). The Missing Element In Reducing the Gap: Eliminating the ‘Blank Stare’.  Teachers College Record, Feature Article, (www.tcrecord.org/Content.asp? ContentID=11381).
  • Pogrow, S. (1998). What is an Exemplary Program and Why Should Anyone Care? Educational Researcher, pp. 22-29.
  • The most recent presentations (Jan 2013) were in Muscat, Oman:  Reducing the Achievement Gap in Math and Science, and The Implications of New Technology for Teaching  and Learning.

Educational Leadership Doctoral Program (EDDL)

Picture of SF State Logo
Position:
Graduate Coordinator
Phone
(415) 338-7873
Biography:
Picture of Barbara Henderson
Position:
Interim Director/Professor
Phone
415-405-4103
Biography:

Barbara Henderson is a Professor in the Department of Elementary Education at San Francisco State University. She is also a faculty member of SF State’s Doctoral Program in Educational Leadership. Her specialization within the Department of Elementary Education is Early Childhood Education and within the doctoral program, she teaches courses in qualitative and mixed method research methodologies. Barbara’s research expertise is in teacher research, self-study research of teacher education practices, and other forms of action and participatory research. She has also conducted evaluation studies of teacher preparation programs.

Barbara earned her Ph.D. in from Stanford University with a concentration in Psychological Studies in Education. She earned her Multiple Subject Teaching Credential from San Francisco State and her undergraduate degree from Haverford College. 

In addition to published articles, Barbara has co-authored two books on teacher research:

  • Perry, G., Henderson, B., & Meier, D. R. (2012). Our inquiry, our practice: Undertaking, supporting, and learning from early childhood teacher research(ers). Washington DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC).
  • Meier, D. R. & Henderson, B.  (2007).  Learning from young children in the classroom: The art and science of teacher research.  New York: Teachers College Press.

Barbara is also co-editor of the National Association on the Education of Young Children’s (NAEYC) online journal on teacher research, Voices of Practitioners, a journal Daniel Meier and Barbara initiated at the organization in 2001.

Barbara was Principal Investigator for an evaluation of the California Teacher Pathway, a program designed to help diversify California’s teacher workforce in elementary schools by providing wrap around support at community college level for underrepresented students, who might not otherwise have considered teaching as a profession.

Since 2010, Barbara has also been the Faculty Advisor for the David and Lucille Packard Foundation’s Dissertation/Pre-Dissertation Fellowship program, which has supported select Ed.D. students from across the CSUs who are conducting dissertation work related to early childhood education.